Cover of A Merry Dialogue Declaringe The Properties Of Shrowde Shrews And Honest Wives

A Merry Dialogue Declaringe The Properties Of Shrowde Shrews And Honest Wives

Auhtor: Desiderius Erasmus

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 178
eBook size: 370Kb

Review by Chandler, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Merry Dialogue Declaringe The Properties Of Shrowde Shrews And Honest Wives':

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (October 28 1466 ? July 12 1536) sometimes known as Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam was a Dutch Renaissance humanist and a Catholic priest and theologian. His scholarly name Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus comprises the following three elements: the Latin noun desiderium (longing or desire the name being a genuine Late Latin name) the Greek adjective ???????? (ersmios) meaning desired and in the form Erasmus also the name of a St. Erasmus of Formiae and the Latinized adjectival form for the city of Rotterdam (Roterodamus = of Rotterdam). Erasmus was a classical scholar who wrote in a pure Latin style and enjoyed the sobriquet Prince of the Humanists. He has been called the crowning glory of the Christian humanists. Using humanist techniques for working on texts he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament. These raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation. He also wrote The Praise of Folly Handbook of a Christian Knight On Civility in Children Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style Julius Exclusus and many other works. Erasmus lived through the Reformation period and he consistently criticized some contemporary popular Christian beliefs. In relation to clerical abuses in the Church Erasmus remained committed to reforming the Church from within. He also held to Catholic doctrines such as that of free will which some Protestant Reformers rejected in favor of the doctrine of predestination. His middle road approach disappointed and even angered many Protestants such as Martin Luther as well as conservative Catholics. He died in Basel in 1536 and was buried in the formerly Catholic cathedral there recently converted to a Reformed church.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Merry Dialogue Declaringe The Properties Of Shrowde Shrews And Honest Wives':


... declaringe the propertyes of shrowde shrewes, and ho- nest wyues, not onelie verie pleasaunte, but also not a ...
... I had leuer lye by a sow with pigges, then with suche a bedfelowe. Eulali. Doest thou not then take him vp, wel favoredly for stumbling. Xantip. ...
... the other it is reason that the woman giue place vnto the man, xan. Is he meete to be called my husbande that maketh me his vnderlynge and his dryuel? ...
... act. Xan. I can euil beleue that Eula. It is none otherwyse, now it is beste that eyther of you one beyng with an other, ye laboure to liue at ...
... and be made sure betwene ye man the wife, &that is best brought aboute by gentilnesse and fayre condycions, for the loue that beautie onelie ...
... hym with faire wordes, or I let hym alone, vntyll the wynd be ouerblowen gyuing him neuer a word at al, vntil the time come that I may eyther excuse ...
... complaynte that she seme not to hate hym but hys vice nor let her play all the blabbe, that in some poynt vnutered, he may know &loue his wiues ...
... here to repete suche thynges as she harde at sermons, and to instruct her with other things that myght haue doone her more good in time to come. This ...
... his doughter, and yf that she woulde not be rewled by wordes (a goddes name take Stafforde lawe) she was his owne. Then the gentylman sayd agayne, ...
... hunting. This mans wife an exceding honest woman, halfe deale suspecte the mater, tried out her husbandes falshed, on a tyme when he had taken his ...
... at home with his owne. I am sure ye knowe Gilberte the holander. Xan. Very well. Eu. He (as it is not vnknowen maried an old wife in his florishing ...
... better so but I coulde not abyde it. Eulalya. I wyll tell you a prety story more, and so make an ende One of oure neyghboures, a well disposed and ...
... nothinge, for his harte must be wonne by lytell and litel by fayre meanes, gentilnesse and forbearing at the last thou shalte eyther wynne him ...
... A tale of a tubbe. Eulalya. A tayle it is, but herken what the taile meaneth. xantippa. Tell me. Eulalia That techeth us that the wyfe ought ...
... sent a fruitfull grounde, a good tylman. Xantip. In that thing he might haue lesse laboure and more thanke. Eula. Few wyues finde at theyr husbandes ...
... mother euen such another. Eula. Do they hate the so deadly. xantip. They woulde se me hanged. Eula. Then forget not then what greater plesure ...
... toppe heuy playing on his lute, sytte thou by and singe to him so shalte thou make hym keepe home, and lessen hys expences This shall he thynke ...
... sayd, I beshrewe thy harte for waking me so early, and so by the vertue of that medycyne she was restored to her speche. But in conclusion her spech ...
... the mooste power be not able to make a woman to be styll, nor to cause her to leue speakyng. The end of this pleasant dialogue declaryng ...
... name Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus comprises the following three elements: the Latin noun desiderium (longing or desire... >>read more<