Cover of A Brief Outline of the Split in the RSDLP

A Brief Outline of the Split in the RSDLP

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1911

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 346
eBook size: 329Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Brief Outline of the Split in the RSDLP':

Every revolution begins at the top as the ruling class with no clear way forward split over what course of action to take. In January 1916 a strike wave developed against food shortages and speculators. Feeling the movement building up from below a section of the ruling class favored making limited concessions. During late 1916 the mystic monk Rasputin was murdered and plots were laid for a palace coup to remove the Tsar and the Tsarina. The signs of splits in the ruling class opened the floodgates of revolution. The tensions brought about by the war of five million dead or wounded of the armys bread ration being cut by a third between December 1916 and February 1917 of the shortages of food in the towns burst to the surface. The February Revolution began on the 23rd (dates are on the old Russian calendar add 13 days for the modern calendar) with a strike by women textile workers in Petrograd. On International Womens Day 90000 were on strike including many soldiers wives. They marched to the Duma (a truncated parliament) demanding bread which as Trotsky commented was like demanding milk from a he-goat. On the following day half of the industrial workers of Petrograd joined the strike. As the strikes grew the slogans rapidly changed to directly political challenges to the regime: Down with the aristocracy! Down with the war! Yet none of the workers organizations initially called for the strikes. Indeed the most brilliant Bolshevik organization the committee in the industrial Vyborg area feeling the tension but not believing the time was right for an insurrection which they saw could develop from the strikes initially opposed the call for strikes on February 23. Thus one of the most oppressed and least organized layers perhaps not as burdened by consideration of where their strike could lead but burning with desire to take action opened the floodgates of revolution. The police tried to break up the crowds aided by Cossacks (cavalry) some mounted police and occasionally by infantry. The crowds fought the police but tried to neutralize the Cossacks and win over the soldiers in action. On the 25th cadet officers fired on demonstrating workers killing 16. On the 27th there were further demonstrations and troops were called out to suppress them. After clashed with the workers the troops began to mutiny. In some places the workers had succeeded in uniting with the soldiers penetrating the barracks and receiving rifles.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Brief Outline of the Split in the RSDLP':


... You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit Marxists Internet Archive ...
... to all friends of Vperyod in foreign countries the contents of our letter to him and request them to translate it into their respective languages, ...
... as: (1) the resolutions of the Northern Conference, (2) the resolutions of the Caucasian Conference and (3) the resolutions of the Southern Conference. ...
... the end of 1903, our Party was the aggregate of the disconnected local Social-Democratic organisations called committees. The Central Committee and the ...
... Iskrists and the anti-Iskrists (the Rabocheye Dyelo-ists and the Bund) in between was the so-called Marsh. The Iskrists carried the day. They achieved ...
... it was decided to choose three persons to the Editorial Board of the Central Organ and three to the Central Committee. Out of the six members who constituted ...
... his seat on the Editorial Board without the three excluded (non-elected) comrades, and the entire minority refused to participate in the election ...
... the Editorial Board with peaceful intentions. ? ? Precisely what the Bolsheviks had predicted came to pass. The old-Iskra line was not retained, ...
... Iskra on questions of principle. ? ? On the other hand, the secret organisation of the Minority was not disbanded, but continued its boycott ...
... congresses are called, as far as possible, every two years). T h i s? h a l f? h a d? b e e n? m u s t e r e d? a l r e a d y. But here the C.C. ...
... of the four Caucasian committees (2) the Conference of three southern committees (Odessa, Nikolayev, and Ekaterinoslav) and (3) the Conference of ...
... a congress of the Russian committees, i.e., the Third Congress of the Party, without regard for the centres abroad that had split from the Party. ? ...
... organised later, and the validity of their confirmation is still in dispute). The other party has the organ Vperyod, the Bureau of Russian Committees ...
... We Bolsheviks maintain that we have on our side the majority of real Party workers active in Russia. We consider that the main cause of the split and ...
... Iskra are essentially the same as those between the old Iskra and Rabocheye Dyelo. We consider these differences important, but, given the opportunity ...
... to Call a Halt. - DJR] NOTES ? [50] A Brief Outline of the Split in the R.S.D.L.P. was printed in leaflet form by the Berne ...
... to the R.S.D.L.P., the Bund was a bourgeois-nationalist type of organisation. It countered the Bolsheviks' programmatic demand for the right of nations ...
... relinquished its struggle against the Soviet power. In March 1921 the Bund decided to dissolve itself, and part of its membership entered the Russian ...
... Congress, the Mensheviks entrenched themselves in the League and launched a struggle against Lenin and the ? Bolsheviks. At the League's Second Congress, ...
... ?[p. 127] ? [53] Galyorka - pseudonym of the Bolshevik M. S. Olminsky (Alexandrov). ? ?[p. 129] ? [54] Voinov - pseudonym of the Bolshevik ...