Cover of A Highborn Liberal Landlord on the New Zemstvo Russia

A Highborn Liberal Landlord on the New Zemstvo Russia

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1897

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 321
eBook size: 225Kb

Review by Daniel G. Lebryk, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Highborn Liberal Landlord on the New Zemstvo Russia':

The February revolution in Russia opened nine months of titanic class struggle which culminated in the coming to power of the working class led by the Bolshevik Party headed by Lenin and Trotsky. Revolution broke out first in Russia because the war placed the greatest burdens on what was industrially the most backward nation in Europe. In Lenins words capitalism broke at its weakest link. The outbreak of the war had initially cut across a revolutionary movement which was developing in Russia in July/August 1914. From having the support of 80 percent of the active workers the Bolsheviks who opposed the imperialist war were driven underground as backward layers of the working class mobilized by the war embraced the ideas of patriotism. The unity of the nation produced at the beginning of an imperialist war is really only a mask. As war drags on it exposes all that is rotten in society sharpening all the social contradictions. So it was in Tsarist Russia. The war only postponed the struggle deepening the eventual revolutionary upheavals. Fifteen million overwhelmingly peasants were drafted into the army where they faced a uniformity of misery which made them open to the ideas of the working class. By 1917 over 800000 workers were concentrated in defense industries in Moscow and 300000 in Petrograd mainly in huge factories employing thousands. In contrast with previous struggles in Russia the cities and countryside were brought together in their determination to be done with Tsarist autocracy.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Highborn Liberal Landlord on the New Zemstvo Russia':


... according to the text in Put Pravdy Translated from the Russian by Bernard Isaacs and Joe Fineberg Edited by Julius Katzer Public Domain: ...
... RUSSIA ? ? Deafened by liberal catch-phrases, people in our country are apt to overlook the actual class stand of the liberal party's real bosses. ...
... it: ? ? Ever since Stolypin became Premier, the government's entire concern for the countryside has been prompted largely by two motives: fear ...
... By the very use of the word Pugachovism our liberal reveals that he is at one with the Purishkeviches. The only difference is that the Purishkeviches ...
... about culture, disgustingly hypocritical exclamations about the new peasant communities and the democratisation of the countryside, and pathetic ...
... the orbit of world capitalism. His ? Liberal Highness would have known this had he possessed at least an elementary knowledge of the fundamental principles ...
... their desperate poverty and starvation, about labour rent, and so forth. His Highness sees that the peasants are turning bourgeois, and goes into ...
... are preserved. ? ? The intelligentsia's first contact with the broad masses of the peasantry, he writes, took place as far back as 1905, but ...
... Familiar Purishkevich-style talk! A little example: If eighty peasant homesteads of twenty-five dessiatines each are set up on 2,000 dessiatines of the ...
... and in the second she would remain Purishkevichian for decades to come? ? ? However, shying away from unpleasant questions, the highborn liberal ...
... 1905, while a similar area was owned by 10,000,000 peasants. But that does not concern the highborn liberal in the least! He assures his readers that ...
... ? What will the result be? the liberal prince asks. Will the government, with the aid of the intelligentsia [who are joining co-operative ...
... will the intelligentsia educate them with the aid of government loans? ? ? The prince anticipates neither of these alternatives. But ...
... entertain such views is not surprising. Neither is his indignation at the growth of atheism surprising, or his pious speeches. What is surprising is ...
... the people's interests can be really defended with the co-operation of the liberals and the Cadets. ? NOTES ? [62] Stolypin's ...
... law (which got its name from P. A. Stolypin, Chairman of the Council of Ministers) the peasant was free to withdraw from the village commune, take ...
... in the countryside and the process of differentiation among the peasantry, and sharpened the class struggle in the village. ? ? The Stolypin ...
... whose name has become a synonym for unprincipled philistinism, sentimentality and day-dreaming. ? ?[p. 102] ? [65] The reference is to the ...
... ReadingLoved this book? Other books that may be interesting to you:Vladimir Ilyich Lenin : A Characterisation of Economic RomanticismVladimir ...
... Stolypin and the Narodnik Agrarian ProgrammesS'o (Alone), published in Paris in 1892, is a collection of poems by the Portuguese poet Ant'onio Nobre. ...