Cover of A History Of New York From The Beginning Of The World To The End Of The Dutch Dynasty Volume 13

A History Of New York From The Beginning Of The World To The End Of The Dutch Dynasty Volume 13

Auhtor: Diedrich Knickerbocker

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 320
eBook size: 657Kb

Review by O. Brown, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A History Of New York From The Beginning Of The World To The End Of The Dutch Dynasty Volume 13':

A History of is a 1971 non-fiction book by physicist Petr Beckmann that presents a laymans introduction to the concept of the mathematical constant Pi. Beckmann was a Czechoslovakian who fled the Communist regime to come to the United States his dislike of authority gives A History of a style that belies its dry title. For example his chapter on the era following the classical age of ancient Greece is titled The Roman Pest he calls the Catholic Inquisition the act of insane religious fanatic and he says that people who question public spending on scientific research are intellectual cripples who drivel about too much technology because technology has wounded them with the ultimate insult: They cant understand it any more.

Excerpts from the Book 'A History Of New York From The Beginning Of The World To The End Of The Dutch Dynasty Volume 13':


... the ancient dutch fa- shion of wearing ten pair of breeches. But the most elegant and ingenious writers on the subject, declare in favour ...
... to say yes and no at the council board, and to have that enviable privilege, the run of the public kitchen - being graciously per- mitted to eat, ...
... chambermaid. The capacious bay still presented the same expan- sive sheet of water, studded with islands, sprinkled with fishing boats, ...
... and without information - of misrepresenting public af- fairs of decrying public measures - of aspersing great characters, and destroying ...
... a more classic cause, for he had read of the singular expedient of that famous de- magogue Caius Gracchus, who when he harangued the Roman populace, ...
... gay vallies through which it rolls, together with the salmon, shad and other fish within its waters, fell into the hands of the victori- ous ...
... that he was serving his country, when he besmutted the character, or damaged the pocket of a political ad- versary. But however they might ...
... speaking for themselves during the preceding reign he determined at once to put a stop to such a griev- ous abomination. Scarcely therefore ...
... negociation with its neighbours, it is the utmost summit of folly, for it ever to be beguiled into a treaty for then comes on the non-fulfilment ...
... of all histories, were driven to the ne- cessity of sifting, detecting and making evident as noon day, matters which were at the commence- ...
... thentic historian of the times, the continual clatter bore no small resemblance to the music of a cooper, hooping a flour barrel. A summons ...
... reserved at first, particularly to people about whom I neither know nor care the value of a brass farthing or a Ver- mont bank note, and am only ...
... comet, like a bombshell into the world, and blow it up like a powder magazine while a fourth, with no great delicacy to this respectable planet, ...
... all the small beer in Fort Christina, turned sour at the sound! The men of the Manhattoes plucked up new courage when they heard their ...
... himself (though in truth his station required a little state and dignity.) appeared with great pomp of equipage on public occasions, and ...
... appeared that the grand council was determined to protect the pro- vince as did the noble and gigantic Pantagruel his army - by covering it ...
... highly indecent, and somewhat disrespectful. They then called a public meeting, where they read the protest, and ad- dressing the ...
... grim silence - now and then his eye would glance over the surrounding rabble, and an indignant grin, like that of an angry mastiff, would mark ...
... custom of sacri- ficing men, and feeding upon man's flesh. Nor are these all the proofs of their utter bar- barism: among many other writers ...
... is this gi- gantic question, completely knocked in the head - so having manfully surmounted all obstacles, and subdued all opposition, what remains ...