Cover of A Womans College From The Outside

A Womans College From The Outside

Auhtor: Virginia Woolf

Language: english
Published: 1926

Genres:

fiction,  short stories
Downloads: 47
eBook size: 56Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Womans College From The Outside':

1882. Born (25 Jan) Adeline Virginia Stephen third child of Leslie Stephen (Victorian man of letters first editor of the Dictionary of National Biography) and Julia Duckworth (of the Duckworth publishing family). Comfortable upper middle class family background. Her father had previously been married to the daughter of the novelist William Makepeace Thackery. Brothers Thoby and Adrian went to Cambridge and her sister Vanessa became a painter. Virginia was educated by private tutors and by extensive reading of literary classics in her fathers library. Virginia Woolfs peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: Woolf is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language. Her novels are highly experimental: a narrative frequently uneventful and commonplace is refractedand sometimes almost dissolvedin the characters receptive consciousness. Intense lyricism and stylistic virtuosity fuse to create a world overabundant with auditory and visual impressions. The intensity of Virginia Woolfs poetic vision elevates the ordinary sometimes banal settings often wartime environments of most of her novels. For example Mrs Dalloway (1925) centres on the efforts of Clarissa Dalloway a middle-aged society woman to organise a party even as her life is paralleled with that of Septimus Warren Smith a working-class veteran who has returned from the First World War bearing deep psychological scars. To the Lighthouse (1927) is set on two days ten years apart. The plot centres around the Ramsay familys anticipation of and reflection upon a visit to a lighthouse and the connected familial tensions. One of the primary themes of the novel is the struggle in the creative process that beset painter Lily Briscoe while she struggles to paint in the midst of the family drama. The novel is also a meditation upon the lives of a nations inhabitants in the midst of war and of the people left behind. It also explores the passage of time and how women are forced by society to allow men to take emotional strength from them.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Womans College From The Outside':


... the roofs of Newnham. There, in the garden, if she needed space to wander, she might find it among the trees and as none but women's faces could meet ...
... Angela herself was, and how bright came back the reflection of herself from the square glass. The whole of her was perfectly delineated-perhaps ...
... hair with blue stones in it, and never a ripple or shadow to break the smooth kiss of Angela and her reflection in the glass, as if she were glad to ...
... a black book and marking with her finger what surely could not be a firm grasp of the science of economics. Only Angela Williams was at Newnham for ...
... it some Mary or Eleanor, Mildred, Sarah, Phoebe upon square cards on their doors. All names, nothing but names. The cool white light withered them and ...
... Such is the power of names written upon cards pinned upon doors. Such too the resemblance, what with tiles, corridors, and bedroom doors, ...
... if the clock were issuing his commands, they were disregarded. Fire, insurrection, examination, were all snowed under by laughter, or softly uprooted, the ...
... cards were spread, falling with their red and yellow, faces on the table, and hands were dabbled in the cards. Good Bertha, leaning with her head ...
... pasturage, a limitless field, since night is unmoulded richness, one must tunnel into its darkness. One must hang it with jewels. Night was shared in ...
... other people were wide awake. When they laughed all together a bird chirped in its sleep out in the garden, as if the laughter... Yes, as if the laughter ...
... immediately clasp the ivory rod of office. Now smooth and colourless, reposing deeply, they lay surrounded, lay supported, by the bodies of youth recumbent ...
... chaotic, trailing and straying and tufting the rose-bushes with shreds of vapour. 'Ah,' breathed Angela, standing at the window in her night-gown. Pain ...
... day, in August, and stooping, kissed her, at least touched her head with her hand, and Angela, positively unable to sit still, like one possessed ...
... glow there. And then, slowly putting there her stockings, there her slippers, folding her petticoat neatly on top, Angela, her other name being Williams, ...
... age nineteen last November), she lay in this good world, this new world, this world at the end of the tunnel, until a desire to see it or forestall ...
... something murmuring in the distance, the world of course, and the morning coming, 'Oh,' she cried, as if in pain. A Woman's College from ...
... Description ...