Cover of A History Of English Prose Fiction

A History Of English Prose Fiction

Auhtor: Bayard Tuckerman

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 149
eBook size: 444Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, March 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A History Of English Prose Fiction':

A History of is a 1971 non-fiction book by physicist Petr Beckmann that presents a laymans introduction to the concept of the mathematical constant Pi. Beckmann was a Czechoslovakian who fled the Communist regime to come to the United States his dislike of authority gives A History of a style that belies its dry title. For example his chapter on the era following the classical age of ancient Greece is titled The Roman Pest he calls the Catholic Inquisition the act of insane religious fanatic and he says that people who question public spending on scientific research are intellectual cripples who drivel about too much technology because technology has wounded them with the ultimate insult: They cant understand it any more.

Excerpts from the Book 'A History Of English Prose Fiction':


... And the more it approaches to this condition, the more realistic it is said to be. But the word realism is a vague term, and is constantly employed ...
... Charles Brockden Brown began the career of the first American novelist with Wieland. His pecuniary necessities and the slight encouragement ...
... means to expose, and thus arouse the sympathy and indignation of a large number of people, can make a novel of purpose a very effective weapon of reform. ...
... Eustace de Ribeaumont, and removing a chaplet of pearls from his own head, he placed it on that of the French knight, with the significant words[7]: ...
... of the Fathers were overridden by the new and noble ideas which were springing up. Doctrines such as that of the Immaculate Conception rapidly won ...
... whether he were on horsbak or on foote. Sir Gareth falls in love at first sight: and euer the more syr Gareth behelde that lady, the more he loued ...
... reprint. ] A History of English Prose Fiction CHAPTER III. THE AGE OF ELIZABETH: LYLY, GREENE, LODGE, SIDNEY. I. ...
... prominent in Elizabeth's reign. There is no sign of the prevailing improvement in the condition of men more suggestive than the effervescence of spirits ...
... with possible incidents. Yet the language, although it has some elegance, is so affectedly formal, that all sense of reality is destroyed. When Philippo's ...
... dangers of Vanity Fair, and brought him at last to the Celestial City, and the welcome of the Shining Ones. The Pilgrim's Progress and the ...
... In the fiction of the Restoration are first observable the new tendencies, which, although but slightly marked at first, have finally given to the ...
... the prisons through debt or crime. From the ranks of the lower clergy were recruited the buck-parsons, so long a scandal to the church and to public ...
... all, only one necessary stage in the development of our own civilization. It must be said, also, that the coarseness of the eighteenth century was ...
... a manner which made it a disgrace rather than an honor. The long years which he passed in the household of Sir William Temple, subject to the humors ...
... is believed to have suggested to Miss Burney some of the incidents in Evelina. This novel was exceedingly popular, and had some merit, considering ...
... at least, is found the combination of a character well drawn and a plot well executed. In the number of his characters and the complication of his ...
... How do I detest myself for being so foolish! A little later, Mr, Turner attended a vestry meeting, at which we had several warm arguments, and ...
... by significant actions and phrases. Thus Mr. Shandy exposes at once the nature of his mind and the vigor of his hobby-horse, when he exclaims to ...
... at a powerful delineation of character, but his works are too evidently a vehicle for his political and philosophical opinions. He represents ...
... the waistcoat embroidered with a little silver, or of white silk worked in the tambour, partridge silk stockings, and gold buckles, ruffles and ...