Cover of A Foreign Office Romance

A Foreign Office Romance

Auhtor: Arthur Conan Doyle

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 115
eBook size: 49Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, December 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Foreign Office Romance':

The green flag.--Captain Sharkey.--The crime of the brigadier.--The Croxley master.--The Slapping Sal.--The Lord of Cha?teau Noir.--The striped chest.--A shadow before.--The king of the foxes.--The three correspondents.--The new catacomb.--The de?but of Bimbashi Joyce.--A Foreign Office romance.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Foreign Office Romance':


... There was his story of Talleyrand and the five oyster-shells, and there was his utterly absurd account of Napoleon's second visit to Ajaccio. Then ...
... personated him at Longwood. But of all his stories there was none which was more notorious than that of the Koran and the Foreign Office messenger. And ...
... and all of his staff were worked to death. We had not Pitt to deal with, which was perhaps as well for us. He was a terrible man, that Pitt, and ...
... ten years of war each nation had got hold of a great deal which had belonged to the other, or to the other's allies. What was to be given back? And what ...
... not wish your people, monsieur, to have any foothold in South Africa, for history has taught us that the British foothold of one half-century is the British ...
... shrimp of a man, very quick and nervous, and he was so delighted now at his own success that he could not sit still, but ran about the room chattering ...
... know that the English will have news of this? Perhaps they may sign the treaty before they know of it.' Monsieur Otto sprang from the ...
... of Monsieur Jackson, and in the club of Brooks, and in the lobby of the Chamber of Deputies, but nowhere did I hear any news. Still, it was ...
... haggard face and trembling hands should rouse suspicion in the English minister. Well, we went round together in one of the Embassy's ...
... I must be prepared. Above all, I must not compromise the Embassy. I ordered our carriage to move on, and I engaged what you call a hackney coach. Then ...
... So I stood outside Milord Hawkesbury's house, and you can think how often my eyes went up to that window in the hope of seeing the candle twinkle ...
... my ears. And then suddenly out of the dull hum of the traffic down in Oxford Street I heard a sound detach itself, and grow louder and louder, ...
... 'This is a pressing business,' said he. 'I have a despatch which I must deliver instantly.' Our coach had rattled down ...
... me?' 'It is a bet.' 'A bet? What d'you mean? Do you understand that I am on the Government service, and that you will ...
... running in my head. He clutched at the door-handle, and again I had to hurl him back into his seat. 'How long will it take?' he gasped. ...
... We had passed the window and there was no candle. I settled down to recite the Chapter of the Stallion to him. Perhaps you ...
... he came upon my nose and upon my eye. I put down my head and thrust at him with it. Pac, he came from below. But, ah! I was too much for him. I hurled ...
... he cried. I could see that it was not my messenger, but a second one. Milord Hawkesbury caught the paper from his hand and read it by the ...
... they could not run across salt water, and Alphonse Lacour was receiving the congratulations of Monsieur Talleyrand and the first Consul before ever his ...
... It was published by McClelland & Stewart. A scanned version is... >>read more<