Cover of Recollections Of Old Liverpool

Recollections Of Old Liverpool

Auhtor: A Nonagenarian

Language: english
Published: 1836

Genres:

history,  biography
Downloads: 172
eBook size: 242Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Recollections Of Old Liverpool':

Recollections Of Old Liverpool by A Nonagenarian. Birth of Author Strong Memory A Long-lived Family Tree in St. Peter s Church-yard Cruelty of Town Boys The Ducking-stool The Flashes in Marybone Mode of Ducking George the Third s Birthday Frigates Launch of the Mary Ellen The Interior of a Slaver Liverpool Privateers Unruly Crews Kindness of Sailors Sailors Gifts Northwich Flatmen The Salt Trade The Salt Tax The Salt Houses Salt-house Dock The White House and Ranelagh Gardens Inscription over the Door Copperas-hill Hunting a Hare Lord Molyneux Miss Brent Stephens Lecture on Heads Mathews At Home Brownlow Hill Mr. Roscoe Country Walks Moss Lake Fields Footpads Fairclough Love Lane Everton Road Loggerheads Lane Richmond Row The Hunt Club Kennels. CHAPTER II. The Gibson s Alderman Shaw Mr. Christian Folly Tavern Gardens in Folly Lane Norton Street Stafford Street Pond by Gallows Mill Skating in Finch Street Folly Tower Folly Fair Fairs in Olden Times John Howard the Philanthropist The Tower Prison Prison Discipline Gross Abuses Howard presented with Freedom Prisons of 1803 Description of Borough Gaol Felons Debtors Accommodations Escape of Prisoners Cells Courtyards Prison Poultry Laxity of Regulations Garnish Fees Fever Abuses Ball Nights Tricks played upon Poor Debtors Execution of Burns and Donlevy for Burglary Damage done by French Prisoners their Ingenuity The Bridewell on the Fort Old Powder Magazine Wretched State of the Place Family Log Durand--His Skill Escape of Prisoners--Their Recapture Durand s Narrative--His Recapture House of Correction Mrs. Widdows.

Excerpts from the Book 'Recollections Of Old Liverpool':


... You entered through a wooden door and went along a shrubberied path which led to the Tavern. Folly-lane (now Islington) was a narrow country lane, with ...
... my road until I came up to a little cottage, the door of which opened just as I was passing it. An old woman came out and began to take down the ...
... After walking for about an hour in a southerly direction, feeling tired and seeing a barn open I went to it and found two men therein threshing wheat. ...
... smack, who had come from Cardigan) that the French were marching on to Liverpool to burn, sack and plunder it, in revenge for the frigates which had ...
... have gone further only we became frightened as our lights went out. It was thought these caves ran up to Chester Cathedral-but that was all stuff. I ...
... again in a quarter of an hour. In this quarter of an hour the little tobacconist's shop was besieged by canvassers on both sides, when the tempting ...
... the bond ceased to have effect, the Major, meeting Colonel Bolton walking with Colonel Earle past the shop, kept at present by Mr. Allender, in Castle-street, ...
... a day after complained of the dirt the trampling of feet had made in their lobbies and yards, and deplored the loss of their stores of soft-water. At ...
... to ruin him in every conceivable way, public and private, but they had exposed themselves to his Remarks, all-pungent as they were, by going into court ...
... who built his house and two others of the old Castle materials. Part of Castle-street is also constructed of the timbers and stones. Old Peter-street ...
... of Everton church. It was a square tower of two stories, and approached from the present Church-street by a little lane. Church-street was then a sandy ...
... that of the excellent lessee of the Theatre Royal, Mr. Lewis. As he was quite as polite a man as the worthy lessee himself, on finding to whom he had ...
... the neighbourhood. On arriving at Mason-street, sure enough, they espied the object of their search watching the operations of some bricklayers busily ...
... of them. On her family increasing the lady and her husband frequently asked Williamson to build her an extra room for a nursery, reminding him that as ...
... population. It is rather singular that in more than one instance cock-pits have been converted into places of public worship. The cock-pit at Aintree, ...
... not imputable to the Flour Dealer, but to the Purchaser of the Flour in not having taken proper precautions in the Making of the Bread, which, owing to ...
... how monstrous the conduct of the prisoners had been, in attempting to force an unprofitable movement upon anyone. I recollect he made use of this remarkable ...
... turned to the hall-porter and requested him to announce to Mr. Clarke that a lady wished to see him for a few minutes. The man quickly returned, requesting ...
... were the friends and acquaintances of my youth. Scarcely a town by the margin of the ocean could be more salt in its people than the men of Liverpool ...
... swim. Our servant-man used to take me to the Ranelagh Gardens every fine afternoon, as it was a favourite lounge. Over the garden door was written-. You ...