Cover of A Characterisation of Economic Romanticism

A Characterisation of Economic Romanticism

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1898

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 107
eBook size: 297Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Characterisation of Economic Romanticism':

Lenin and Trotsky had seen the Russian revolution merely as the prologue to the international revolution. In isolation backward Russia was not ready for socialism. The beginning of socialism meant a higher level of productive forces than even the most developed capitalist economy. This was only possible on a world scale. In the phrase of Lenin capitalism had broken at its weakest link. But the Russian revolution was envisaged as the beginning of a series of revolutions in Europe and on a world scale that would usher in a world socialist federation. Lenins confidence in the possibility of world revolution was justified by the convulsive events of 1918 and particularly 1919 when the ruling class itself believed that it was about to be overthrown. The only thing that saved them were the leaders of the Social Democratic Parties. The isolation of the revolution in turn allowed the growth of a privileged bureaucratic caste in Russia itself. Gradually power was taken from the soviets and concentrated in the hands of millions of officials in the state machine the party and the army. The mass of the working class were elbowed aside and the original democratic and internationalist aspirations of the Russian revolution were suppressed. The Gorbachev regime today despite its recent declarations on democracy is a million miles removed from the Russian revolution in the heroic period of Lenin and Trotsky. There was more democracy in the weak Russian workers state of October 1917 beset by civil war and the 21 armies of imperialism than in Russia today.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Characterisation of Economic Romanticism':


... which Sismondi imperceptibly passed (and he could not do otherwise, for if he had done he could not have argued about the market )? This is something ...
... cannot grow so quickly. Using this extremely ill-chosen example to show the difference between ? ? * Sismondi had only just separated capital from ...
... possible only little by little, and is quite unable to explain the process of accumulation. This is the second highly characteristic feature of ...
... also provides a market for that department of capitalist production which manufactures means of production! However much we shift the question from ...
... without calculating the market (produire sans calculer le march?), and to produce as much as possible, and here is the characteristic feature of ...
... restores the romanticist of former days! The problem is reduced to one of a difference in terms! Actually, the problem boils down to the fact ...
... The sum-total of all these strata of the population constitutes the relative surplus population, or reserve army. The latter term distinctly shows ...
... has told us when an increase in the population is desirable, devotes a special chapter to attacking religion for having failed to condemn imprudent ...
... under the present capitalist system. ? ? Thus, on the question of machines - this supremely important question of theoretical political economy ...
... radically differ from Sismondi's, and for that reason lead to a diametrically opposite point of view concerning capitalism. ? ? In A Critique of ...
... capitalist mode of production as the most advantageous for production in general, as the most advantageous for the creation of wealth, and for his time ...
... tie, which is full of fluctuations and contradictions, gives one no right to deny its existence. And we know that it is the development of contradictions ...
... ? * Substituting unity along the lines of social status and social interests of a whole country, and even of the whole world, for local and social-estate ...
... and the exploitation of the countryside by the town - these universal concomitants of developing capitalism - are a necessary product of ...
... gubernias. See S. A. Korolenko, Hired Labour, etc. ? IV PRACTICAL ...
... class of countrymen, the yeomanry,** whose almost complete extinction they now deplore (II, 357-58). ? ? The plans of romanticism are depicted ...
... sought in economic reality he may be profoundly convinced that A. Wagner's theory of the classification of the national revenue is the most outstanding ...
... romanticism, which does not pay sufficient attention to the process of economic development that is actually taking place. We have seen that Sismondi ...
... secondly, because the progress of industry cheapens articles of consumption, substituting spirits for beer, potatoes for bread, cotton for wool and ...
... under the guise of socialism, advocated bourgeois-liberal reformism from university chairs. (Katheder in German). The fear aroused among the exploiting ...