Cover of A Roman Lawyer In Jerusalem

A Roman Lawyer In Jerusalem

Auhtor: W Story

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 430
eBook size: 265Kb

Review by A. Dent, June 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Roman Lawyer In Jerusalem':

Alfred Thomas Story (1842 ?1934) was an English journalist poet and author of numerous books. He was born in North Cave in the county of York the fourth child in the large family of James Story. His family was an old Durham branch of the Northumbrian Story family. His father a property-owner and keen amateur musician composer and poet died when his son was about ten years of age. He was educated in Manchester studying for some time at Owens College. He began his career as a provincial journalist and became the sub-editor of Human Nature a monthly periodical to which he contributed his first poems. Subsequently he went to Germany to study. He spent two years in Switzerland acting as foreign sub-editor of the Swiss Times published at first in Geneva and afterwards in Paris as the Continental Times. Returning to England he worked for several years in the provincial press part of this time on the Northampton Mercury. Settling in London he contributed during the ensuing years to many newspapers and literary periodicals. He was a sometime editor of The Phrenological Magazine and published two books on the now discredited subject of phrenology. During his long life he produced numerous books. These include biographies (The Life of John Linnell William Ewart Gladstone and his ContemporariesWilliam Blake his Life Character and Genius James Holmes and John Varley) local histories (Historical Legends of Northamptonshire American Shrines in England) literary essays (Books that are the Hearts of Men A Book of Vagrom Men and Vagrant Thoughts) popular science works history (The Building of the Empire) economics (The Martyrdom of Labour) travel (Swiss Life in Town and Country North Wales) public school fiction (Boys of St. Elmos) romances (Only Half a Hero Fifine) and poetry (The Northern Cross and Other Poems The Trumpeter of the Dawn and Other Poems).

Excerpts from the Book 'A Roman Lawyer In Jerusalem':


... upon the East As simply hateful-blazing, barren, bleak, And longs again to find himself in Rome, After the tumult of its streets, its trains Of slaves ...
... A universal tumult-then a hush Worse than the tumult-all eyes staining down To the arena's pit-all lips set close- All muscles strained-and ...
... thought Trained up against it-to excuse his faith, And half admit the Christus he thinks God Is, at the least, a most mysterious man. Bear with me ...
... whim beyond the term of Truth, For here a case comes up to which in vain I seek a clue: you could clear up my mind, But you are absent-so I send these ...
... constantly Long nose, full lips, hands tapering, full of veins His movements nervous as he walked he seemed Scarcely to heed the persons whom he passed, ...
... he told:. Some say that Judas was a base, vile man Who sold his master for the meanest bribe Others again insist he was most right, Giving to justice ...
... all the men Who followed Christus thought that he was God. Some feared him for his power of miracles Some were attracted by a sort of spell Some followed ...
... all the facts were fresh, and oft revolved In latter days, and with no change of mind And this is my solution of the case:. Daily he heard his master's ...
... And Christus saw the trouble in his mind, And said 'Behold, among you here is one That shall betray me-he to whom I give This sop,' and he the sop ...
... The Lord and master whom you love, to death.' And, smiling, then he answered, 'Fear you not Do you your duty take no heed of me.' 'Is not this vile.' ...
... nothing said, but reached His arm out, and we bound his hands with cords. This done I turned, but all the rest had fled, And he alone was left to meet ...
... impossible, for he is God. And yet you live-you live. He spared you, then. Where am I. what has happened. A black cloud Came o'er me when you laid ...
... nothing. Soon he went away. That night I saw not Judas. The next day, Ghastly, clay-white, a shadow of a man, With robes all soiled and torn, and ...
... Judas, and to comfort him. The sky was dark with heavy lowering clouds A lifeless, stifling air weighed on the world A dreadful silence like a nightmare ...
... tells Weighs with me more the more I ponder it For thus I put it: Either Judas was, As John affirms, a villain and a thief, A creature lost to shame ...
... that, full-grown, Leaps all at once to such a height of crime. Again, how comes it that this wretch, whose heart Is eased to shame, flings back ...
... this man. I said no ill of him. If crime there be, 'Twas yours who doomed him unto death, not mine. A villain was he. So Barabbas was. But did Barabbas ...
... To open the gates of glory to his Lord, Opened in their stead the prison's jarring door, And saw above him his dim dream of Love Change to a Fury stained ...
... infernal gods. The sun is sinking-all the sky's afire- And vale and mountain glow like molten ore In the intense full splendor of its rays. A half-hour ...
... It was published in 1937. The book contains illuminating tracts on war, religion, nationalism and ethics, and was cited as a major influence on Thomas ...