Cover of A Journal Of The Plague Year

A Journal Of The Plague Year

Auhtor: Daniel Defoe

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 365
eBook size: 227Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Journal Of The Plague Year':

A Journal Of The Plague Year by Daniel Defoe. In 1665 the plague swept through London claiming over 97 000 lives. Daniel Defoe was just five at the time of the plague but he later called on his own memories as well as his writing experience to create this vivid chronicle of the epidemic and its victims. A Journal 1722 follows Defoe s fictional narrator as he traces the devastating progress of the plague through the streets of London. Here we see a city transformed some of its streets suspiciously empty some - with crosses on their doors - overwhelmingly full of the sounds and smells of human suffering. And every living citizen he meets has a horrifying story that demands to be heard.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Journal Of The Plague Year':


... get them to let them through in the night so that in short, the shutting up of houses was in no wise to be depended upon. Neither did it answer ...
... of distress and this tavern where they held their dub being within view of the church-door, they had the more particular occasion for their atheistical ...
... who, having thus broken out of his house in Aldersgate Street or thereabout, went along the road to Islington he attempted to have gone in at the ...
... am to speak of the civil preparations or religious. They were, indeed, as if they had had no warning, no expectation, no apprehensions, and consequently ...
... encourage them, for innumerable of the bearers died of the distemper, infected by the bodies they were obliged to come so near. And had it not been ...
... the ships were not entirely safe from the infection, for many died and were thrown overboard into the river, some in coffins, and some, as I heard, ...
... they brought all into one public stock, and thus they began their journey. It seems that in the morning when they set out the wind blew, as the ...
... [Footnote in the original.] Constable. We furnish you I What mean you by that? John. Why, you would not have us starve, would ...
... as to go abroad for such things as they wanted, and this pinched them very hard, for now they had little or nothing but what the charitable gentlemen ...
... that the infection was propagated insensibly, and by such persons as were not visibly infected, who neither knew whom they infected or who they were ...
... infected as soon as it was known by themselves but as that cannot be expected from them, and the examiners cannot be supposed, as above, to go into ...
... given already. Nay, one of the most eminent physicians, who has since published in Latin an account of those times, and of his observations ...
... sick people and, in short, lay in the beds with their wives or relations when they were infected. And what was the consequence, but the same ...
... 5th September to the 12th 1056 12th 19th 1132 19th ...
... such as apples, pears, plums, cherries, grapes, and they were the cheaper because of the want of people but this made the poor eat them to excess, ...
... neither. That abundance of them died is certain - many of them came within the reach of my own knowledge - but that all of them were swept off I ...
... { St James's 12 January 31 February 7 { St Bride's 13 { St James's ...
... Inn, to be seen there. Everybody was at peace there was no occasion for lawyers besides, it being in the time of the vacation too, they were generally gone ...
... know not what nay, to a thousand worse dealings with the devil than they were really guilty of. And this trade grew so open and so generally practised ...
... by the aldermen to inquire and learn from time to time what houses in every parish be visited, and what persons be sick, and of what diseases, ...