Cover of The Unfortunate Happy Lady A True History

The Unfortunate Happy Lady A True History

Auhtor: Aphra Behn

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 308
eBook size: 312Kb

Review by Dr. Bojan Tunguz, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Unfortunate Happy Lady A True History':

Aphra Behn (10 July 1640 ? 16 April 1689) was a prolific dramatist of the Restoration and was one of the first English professional female writers. Her writing participated in the amatory fiction genre of British literature.

Excerpts from the Book 'The Unfortunate Happy Lady A True History':


... And having dipp'd some paltry Acres of Land, deeper than ever Heaven dipp'd 'em in Rain, he was as good as his Word, and brought her to Town with him, ...
... for her part, by this Time, had reckon'd up, and promis'd to herself an Advantage of at least three hundred Pounds, one way or other by this bargain. ...
... in Conversation: Pray be pleas'd to satisfy my Curiosity so far as to inform me in the Truth of this Matter? Is it really so or not?'' Philadelphia ...
... and Apellation of Brother and Sister.'' ``And your Ladyship imagines Sir William and I do so?'' reply'd Philadelphia, by way of Question. ...
... took Coach from St. James's, about two Hours since'': ``We shall be excellent Company when they come,'' (said a fourth) ``I hope ...
... all the fair Promises of her reverend Hostess. She had not been retir'd above an Hour, e're a She-attendant waited on her, to know if she wanted ...
... not forbear discovering the Apprehensions she had of her Brother's Unkindness, still entertaining her Reverence with the Fear she had of his Disappointment ...
... ever was in any House, except this and another, where my Brother lodg'd: And to your other Question I must Answer, that I Love all Men.'' ``That's ...
... am sure, none of those Barbarians, of which you had Occasion to speak but now, would have been guilty! O hear, and help me! for Heaven's Sake, hear and ...
... not have her Brother know it, as she calls him, for a thousand Worlds, and more Money.'' ``Well, my Son,'' (reply'd old Beldam) ``you may take ...
... her, as I am earnest to entreat it of you.'' ``A very beautiful Lady 'tis,'' (return'd the Counsellor) ``and very modest, I believe.'' ...
... Afternoon for his own Country. Gracelove in the mean Time return'd to the Counsellor's, with a great deal of Joy, for having discover'd Sir William ...
... that one Sir William Wilding, an extravagant, mad, young Spark of such a County, who lately went by the borrow'd Name and Title of 'Squire Sportman, ...
... Years, for Want of a Ransom which he had often endeavour'd to raise by Letters, that he sent hither to his Friends (in England) amongst which Counsellor ...
... he rewarded as I have said before. His Funeral was very sumptuous and honourable indeed! and as soon as it was over, Eugenia desir'd her young beautiful ...
... curious to know to whom he was oblig'd for so many and great Favours But he was answer'd, That they came from a Lady who desir'd to have her Name ...
... wonderful Goodness of a Stranger!'' (cry'd Gracelove) ``uncommon and rare amongst Relations and Friends! How have I, or how can I ever merit this?'' ...
... if she could fancy his Person, she would take him into her Mercy and marry him. Being assur'd, that such a virtuous Wife as she would prove, must necessarily ...
... she) ``I drank to thee and send thee back thy own Ring, with Philadelphia's Heart.'' He startl'd, blush'd, and looked wildly whilst ...
... tale number 43. Andrew Lang included it in The Crimson Fairy Book. Ruth Manning-Sanders included it, as The Prince and the Dragons, in A Book ...