Cover of A Discourse For The Time

A Discourse For The Time

Auhtor: William Henry Furness

Language: english
Published: 1852

Genres:

religion,  essays
Downloads: 306
eBook size: 276Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Discourse For The Time':

... Church, by W. H.. Title: A Discourse for the Time, delivered January 4, 1852 in the First Congregational Unitarian Church. Author: W. H. Furness. Release ...
... But there is no help for it. We must take our lot as we find it. And such is the nature of our social fabric drawing all the power of the government ...
... their comforts, and keep aloof and indifferent, and flatter themselves that they are the wise and the prudent, they are the enlightened, judicious ones. ...
... Into such hands will public affairs fall. And then there is no man-there is no woman, so retired but she shall find to her cost, that she has an interest, ...
... private dwellings with a most disastrous influence. They would make their appearance in the shape of armed men. They would be heard in the rattle of musketry ...
... who have been so savagely butchered in the streets of Paris, little dreamed, when they left their homes that day, that they would be shot down as the ...
... avoid the danger and the consequences of a conflagration. Because a man keeps himself retired, never reading, never thinking about what is going on ...
... life are put in peril, they suffer the least, though they lose everything, who are inspired by the conviction that they have tried to be faithful and ...
... 'I am a man, and I hold nothing human foreign to me.' And does not our common Christianity teach over and over again in a thousand ways, that we are ...
... we gain no additional security. Still our private lot is inextricably bound up with the public interest and when those interests suffer, we must suffer ...
... duty as men, and as Christians, to take a hearty, intelligent, self-sacrificing interest in what is going on on the public theatre of the nation to which ...
... of a common nature and a common interest, which the course of things is laying bare to all men's view. As you are men, human beings, your hearts must ...
... has heard the great Hungarian exile, who has come to us, bringing his unhappy country in his heart, that does not feel his kindred to his oppressed brethren ...
... In reason, and in the nature of things, it is connected with him and with his great purpose. So clearly is this so, that they, who see what a monstrous ...
... upon American Slavery as a thing, which we, ourselves, are at this moment busily engaged in abolishing. He finds men, eminent in office and in ability, ...
... much he may have heard about it, he does not yet know that we have not the will to settle it. He does not yet know how deep-seated it is, and how mighty ...
... and rob them of their territory. In that behalf our statesmen have sought to enlist the interests and sympathies of foreign nations. And that it is, whose ...
... the noble heart of Hungary's devoted servant and chief, and more than all, if it cause him to falter in the cause of universal humanity, what tongue now ...
... slave among them, and then all that we need do is done, and our simple existence as a nation becomes an irresistible intervention against the violation ...
... in 1890, but disliked it in 1897 he became secretary of the Royal Institute of British Architects, a post he... >>read more<