Cover of The Unforeseen Wager

The Unforeseen Wager

Auhtor: Frank Morlock

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 205
eBook size: 337Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, September 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Unforeseen Wager':

Franois-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 ? 30 May 1778) better known by the pen name Voltaire was a French Enlightenment writer and philosopher famous for his wit and for his advocacy of civil liberties including freedom of religion and free trade. Voltaire was a prolific writer and produced works in almost every literary form including plays poetry novels essays historical and scientific works more than 20000 letters and more than 2000 books and pamphlets. He was an outspoken supporter of social reform despite strict censorship laws and harsh penalties for those who broke them. As a satirical polemicist he frequently made use of his works to criticize intolerance religious dogma and the French institutions of his day. Voltaire was one of several Enlightenment figures whose works and ideas influenced important thinkers of both the American and French Revolutions.

Excerpts from the Book 'The Unforeseen Wager':


... any media on stage, cinema, or television, or audio or any other media, including readings for which an entrance fee or the like is charge. Permissions ...
... Morgana No. Anne Does he know you? Morgana Only if the servant has no common sense and gives my real name. ...
... I lacked respect-and if the masters wish to interrogate us-for eleven years, Madame- Morgana Now, you try to evade the question. ...
... to see this to the end. (Enter Anne.) Morgana I order you to be silent about whatever happens now- (aside) I'm getting angry with ...
... that you were in his apartment. I await your explanation of this strange mystery. Prim Madame, I can say to you that- Morgana ...
... Yes, Madame expects him this evening. Lovelace But to have told them to say she's Lady Ormont. I don't- Bellamy You still have ...
... Bellamy So you are the dupe of that. You! Anne What do you mean, dupe? Bellamy When I spoke like that to ...
... (trying to embrace her) Anne Stop it. You irritate me. Bellamy Well, Anne, I've read, in a reliable book, that the way to make ...
... becomes scornful-and avenges herself. Do you suppose that I told My Lady about this for any other reason than to put her in mind to revenge ...
... air, our patience is so good natured that the empire is taken before you are aware. Lovelace Whether I believe it or not, I would gladly ...
... excited except by passions which involve nothing but love of their own sex and hate of the other. Protect yourself, he'd add- Madame, I- ...
... I've learned. No, that would involve my officer-and I want him left out of it. If, by a bet- (she looks at the door to her chamber, musing) ...
... Morgana We shall see, we shall see-let's begin. Belton Madame these details which are to be explained are rather low and ignoble. ...
... Belton Wait, Madame, all is not said. Morgana Oh, I have lost, sir, I have lost. Belton Wait a minute. Peg holes, folding ...
... Belton Madame. Morgana But, darling, I perceive the stag you were hunting led you a merry chase. Belton No, Madame. ...
... Belton Ah, m'dear, m'dear, you beat me into the ground. Morgana No, no, what I told you is, without doubt, true. Belton ...
... all women have over their husbands? And, if I was more pretty, and more clever- Lovelace Impossible. Morgana Still, sir, ...
... Morgana Anne , you tell Trim to pay off Bellamy tomorrow and send him away. Anne Madame, what can he have done? He's ...
... child, kiss your aunt. Morgana With all my heart. Sophia And me, Madame, what happiness I feel- Belton Madame, ...
... of the working classes of late nineteenth century London. The first edition was published in two volumes as Life and Labour of the People, Vol. ...