Cover of A Journey Into The Interior Of The Earth

A Journey Into The Interior Of The Earth

Auhtor: Jules Verne

Language: english
Published: 1877

Genres:

fiction,  action adventure,  science fiction
Downloads: 468
eBook size: 360Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, December 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Journey Into The Interior Of The Earth':

Journey to the Center of the Earth is a classic 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne (published in the original French as Voyage au centre de la Terre). The story involves a professor who leads his nephew and hired guide down a volcano in Iceland to the center of the Earth. They encounter many adventures including prehistoric animals and natural hazards eventually coming to the surface again in southern Italy.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Journey Into The Interior Of The Earth':


... Exercises the Professor Undoubtedly it is Runic, said the Professor, bending his brows but there is a secret in it, and I mean to discover the ...
... I thought, these words seem to justify my uncle's view about the language of the document. In the fourth line appeared the word 'luco', which means ...
... at the origin of the earth. Upon my word, this is a very clever hypothesis, I exclaimed, in spite rather of myself. And which Humphry Davy demonstrated ...
... to charge double fares but we did not trouble ourselves about mere trifles. . You must be on board on Tuesday, at seven in the morning, said Captain ...
... them? My uncle's eyes and mine met. He hesitated. This direct question went to the root of the matter. But after a moment's reflection he decided ...
... by trusting myself to it on horseback across an arm of the sea. If they are as intelligent as they are said to be, I thought, they won't try it. In any ...
... and, therefore, according to Icelandic gastronomy, much preferable to fresh butter. Along with this, we had 'skye,' a sort of clotted milk, with ...
... of the solar rays. I was forgetting where and who I was, to live the life of elves and sylphs, the fanciful creation of Scandinavian superstitions. ...
... the Professor for there was no change in the beds, and the transitional characteristics became more and more decided. The electric light was ...
... what we are about. We are not in Saknussemm's road, and all we have to do is to go back. Let us take a night's rest, and in three days we shall ...
... between ourselves and the stream, the noise of which was becoming fainter. We returned. Hans stopped where the torrent seemed closest. I sat near the ...
... my poor Grauben, all that busy world underneath which I was wandering about, was passing in rapid confusion before my terrified memory. ...
... of granite, and on the opposite shores we shall find fresh passages opening. How long do you suppose this sea to be? Thirty or forty leagues so ...
... number of planks, straight and bent, and of frames, were covering the ground, enough almost for a little fleet. Uncle, what wood is this? I cried. It ...
... like a red-hot coal, and as large as a man's head. Nature has endowed it with an optical apparatus of extreme power, and capable of resisting the pressure ...
... the near cessation of a storm. A few overhanging rocks afforded us some shelter from the storm. Hans prepared some food, which I could not touch and ...
... known in modern palaeontology. But that a man, a living man, and therefore whole generations doubtless besides, should be buried there in the bowels ...
... that blew past my face. The descent became steeper. I believe we were no longer sliding, but falling down. I had an impression that we were dropping ...
... chariots driven at full speed over the stones, or a roar of unintermitting thunder. Then the disordered compass, thrown out of gear by the electric currents, ...
... in the east were the mountains of Calabria. And that threatening volcano far away in the south was the fierce Etna. Stromboli, Stromboli! I repeated. My ...