Cover of A Novelist On Novels

A Novelist On Novels

Auhtor: W George

Language: english
Published: 1918

Genres:

non fiction,  essays,  sexuality
Downloads: 372
eBook size: 443Kb

Review by A. Dent, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Novelist On Novels':

Alexander George (Alec) Craig (1897?1973) was an author and poet who wrote extensively about banned books. Craig was interested more generally in sexual behaviour and reform and was also engaged with the socialist movement. He was involved with the Progressive League reviewing books for their journal. His papers are in the archives of Senate House Library.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Novelist On Novels':


... celebrity, and needs to judge no more, because no longer does he fear judgment. He is like a motorist who has sowed his wild petrol. He said to me: ...
... tramp or an expert witness. One knows that one will never be so popular as Beecham's pills thence is but a step to picture oneself as less worthy. We ...
... Mr Bent he says: 'Oh, yes, he writes about the North Country, doesn't he. Or is it the West Country. Tried one of his books once. I forget its name, ...
... that we are not business men. What are we to do. Shall we form a trade union and establish a piece rate. Shall we sell our novels by the yard. May we ...
... devoted to archangels. There is nothing extraordinary in these novels they merely happen to be reviewed on the same day. The collection compares ...
... achievement, for by young men is meant those who have not passed, or have but lately passed, thirty. That they should show promise at all is remarkable ...
... too much, he analyses too fully, discovers too many elements. It may be urged that no artist can see or analyse too fully. But he can, if he discovers ...
... his discontented wife, her self-righteous child hold their own views, and not enough those of the world which contains them. An amazing charge ...
... one thinks also of an Italian greyhound with folded paws, or a furred creature of the bush that lurks and watches with eyes mischievous rather than ...
... a steam civilisation the old horse-plough of our fathers. I do not think that we shall break the old plough now and then we may use it upon sands, ...
... four-and-six penn'orth of truth, the fact remains that they do buy, that the deplorable authors do live, and that they do persist in writing their ...
... drives out bad the Puritans would find a greater safety and the world a greater freedom in allowing good literature to vie with evil the good would ...
... belts, and drinks every morning great bowls of chocolate. And it is Tartarin who, light-heartedly, joins the colonial infantry regiment and goes singing ...
... time. His is the coarseness of the drunkard, a jovial and not a maudlin drunkard when sober he reacts against his own brutality, vows to '. purge and ...
... than they are Chinese: they are human, common. But the outer Falstaff is English, and the lawless root of him is yet more English, for there is not a ...
... proposals of Catherine of Russia he is the favourite of the Grand Seignior's favourite he is haunted by the Lady Fragantia, who was 'like a summer's ...
... and a violet face.]. The quality of rhythm being obvious in music needs no discussion it is the only form of rhythm the popular can recognise, but ...
... lies the difference between Flaubert and de Maupassant it may be, too, that Boileau was right in advising the poet a hundred times to replace his ...
... produced their unequalled work . while of late years they have taken to European ways, and have come to paint so ill that they are admired in respectable ...
... almost impossible to learn anything, because up to the eighteenth century anything and anybody intellectually valuable was burnt early genius could depend ...