Cover of A Minstrel In France

A Minstrel In France

Auhtor: Harry Lauder

Language: english
Published: 1918

Genres:

fiction and literature,  war
Downloads: 306
eBook size: 235Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Minstrel In France':

... farewell and godspeed, all my friends and my relations, and I went among them, shaking them by the hand and thinking of the long whiles before I'd be ...
... they did-as they did. Their deeds at Gallipoli speak for them and will forever speak for them-the men of Australia and New Zealand. There the word ...
... again. There were scores of thousands of men in Britain who needed only the last quick shove to send them across the line of enlistment. And after I ...
... and hoping for the best. One thing was sure we might not let the laddie see how close we were to greeting. It was for us to be so brave as God would ...
... he spoke to me, and understood at once, from the tone of my voice, that I did not know, he had not been able to go on. His heart was too tender to ...
... his boyhood. You house, you barn, yon wooded rise against the sky are landmarks for him. And he is pretty sure to meet old friends. They nod to him, ...
... bases and give concerts. There were troops moving in and out of the bases all the time men who'd been in the trenches or in action in an offensive ...
... before the ship sails.. That simple order brought home the grim facts of war at that moment as scarcely anything else could have done. Here was a ...
... so much breaking in. Men go about, behind the front, and after a battle, picking up everything that has been thrown away. Everything is sorted and ...
... to anyone had they seen and heard me. There I was, with Johnson at my piano, like some wayside tinker setting up his cart and working at his trade. ...
... on Vimy Ridge, calm, dispassionate, devoted to his duty and the day's work, quietly giving the directions that guided the British guns in their ...
... had almost fallen into that pit, with its sputtering, busy guns, I had not been able to make even a good guess as to where they were. The very presence ...
... cars were waiting, and Johnson, too. Everything was shipshape and ready for a new start, and we climbed in. As we drove off I looked back at Vimy Ridge. ...
... Though I remember my son and want to join the ranks, I have obeyed. LAUDER ADDRESSING BRITISH TROOPS BEHIND THE LINES IN FRANCE (See Lauder08.jpg)]. The ...
... they looked as though they had been painted against the background of the landscape with water colors. It was hard to believe that war had passed ...
... night they kept them there, standing at attention, stark naked, so that they were half-frozen when the gray, cold light of the dawn began to show ...
... planes to bomb unprotected towns and kill women and babies ours go in for bombing ammunition dumps and trains and railway stations and other places ...
... the audience. And such audiences have been nearly impossible to trace, later, in the box-office reports. But that is the first time in my life, and, ...
... beyond words and speech. And then at last we stepped back into the cars, and resumed our journey on the Bapaume road. We started slowly, and I looked ...
... any sight I saw in France. I did not care to look at it. So I was glad when we motored on to the headquarters of the Fourth Army, where I had the honor ...