Cover of Zanoni

Zanoni

Auhtor: Edward Bulwer Lytton

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 171
eBook size: 768Kb

Review by Beth Cholette, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Zanoni':

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton 1st Baron Lytton PC (25 May 1803 ? 18 January 1873) was an English politician poet playwright and prolific novelist. He was immensely popular with the reading public and wrote a stream of bestselling novels which earned him a considerable fortune. But like many authors of the period his style seems florid and embellished to modern tastes. He coined the phrases the great unwashed pursuit of the almighty dollar the pen is mightier than the sword and the famous opening line It was a dark and stormy night.

Excerpts from the Book 'Zanoni':


... Mark me I have prepared all to fly. See,-I have my passport my horses wait without relays are ordered. I have thy gold. (And the wretch, as ...
... man's passion and a young man's pride: This glorious creature, thought he, may yet be mine. He felt, while thus wrapped in delicious ...
... sacrifice, but awaking and missing him, has a vision of the procession to the guillotine, with Zanoni there, radiant in youth and beauty, followed ...
... you must seize Nature as her master, not lackey her as her slave? You demand mastery over the past, a conception of the future. Has not ...
... it to idealise the scenes of his actual life. Before this powerful will, Glyndon drew back more awed and admiring than before the calmer beauty which ...
... and upward, as the soul mounts on the tones of a lyre! Till I knew thee, I was as a slave to the earth. Thou hast given to me the liberty of the ...
... for me? said the girl, bitterly. Thou hast read my heart thou knowest that thou art become the lord of my destiny. But to be bound beneath ...
... the breast of the Neapolitan with awe and wonder, against which all the haughty arrogance and learned scepticism of his maturer manhood combated in ...
... and anger. Perhaps (I must own the truth) the wine had produced in me a wild disposition to take offence and provoke quarrel. As the prince left me, ...
... observing the tone of supreme indifference with which he spoke of those changes on the face of earth which he asserted he had witnessed, ventured ...
... images of his past time, the golden shepherd hours, when to live was but to enjoy. He approached nearer and nearer to the scene, and suddenly ...
... not raise her above her human heart, for THAT has a heaven of its own. ... I have just looked on her in sleep,-I have heard ...
... Glyndon rose abruptly. Why revive those recollections of folly and presumption? Have I not said that I have returned to my native ...
... by day, I am forging my own fetters. I live in other lives than my own, and in them I have lost more than half my empire. Not lifting them aloft, ...
... still clinging to the image of Zanoni, sank into a passive lethargy which held her very reason in suspense. The hours passed: night ...
... escape the blessed Revolution? Desire! Oh! cried Nicot, suddenly, and, falling down, he clasped Glyndon's knees,-oh, save me with thyself! ...
... dwells a singular recluse. In the season of the malaria the native peasant flies the rank vegetation round but he, a stranger and a foreigner, ...
... Clarence turned, and sickened once more to see at his heels, with the same servile smile on his face, the pursuer he fancied he had escaped. He ...
... I venture forth in the streets at night. (During the latter part of the Reign of Terror, Fouquier rarely stirred out at night, and never without ...
... there,-HIS turn has come. Die not yet leave me not behind hear me-hear me! shrieked the inspired sleeper. What! and thou smilest still! ...