Cover of A Liberal Labour Party Manifesto

A Liberal Labour Party Manifesto

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1919

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 366
eBook size: 233Kb

Review by A. Dent, December 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Liberal Labour Party Manifesto':

A Marxist movement had developed in Russia during the last decade of the nineteenth century. It was a response to the rapid growth of industry cities and the proletariat (a group of lower-class workers especially in industry). Its first intellectual spokesmen were people who had turned away from relying on the peasants (rural poor people) of the Russian villages and countryside and they placed their hopes on the proletariat. They aimed for a revolution that would transform Russia into a democratic republic. Lenins writings and work focused on the role of the proletariat as promoters of this revolution. However he also stressed the role of intellectuals (people engaged in thinking) who would provide the movement with the theories that would guide the revolutions progress. Lenin expressed these ideas in his important book Whats to Be Done? in 1902. When the leaders of Russian Marxism gathered for the first important party meeting in 1903 these ideas clashed with the idea of a looser more democratic workers party that was promoted by Lenins old friend Iuli Martov (18731923). This disagreement over the nature and organization of the party was complicated by many other conflicts and from its first important gathering Russian Marxism split into two factions (opposing groups). The one led by Lenin called itself the majority faction (bolsheviki or the Bolsheviks) while the other took the name of minority faction (mensheviki or the Mensheviks). The Bolsheviks and Mensheviks disagreed not only over how to organize the movement but also over most other political problems. In 1905 an uprising now known as the Revolution of 1905 occurred in Russia. Widespread revolt against the Russian czars government spread throughout the country but was eventually put to an end by the government. This revolt among the Russian people surprised all Russian revolutionary leaders including the Bolsheviks. Lenin managed to return to Russia only in November when the defeat of the revolution was practically certain. But he was among the last to give up.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Liberal Labour Party Manifesto':


... A LIBERAL LABOUR PARTY MANIFESTO ? Zvezda, No. 32, December 3, 1911 Signed: Vl. Ilyin? Published according ...
... as is to be expected of anyone who has any realisation of the serious political responsibility he bears for his words and deeds. And it must be said ...
... in which, although the possibility of social upheavals is not excluded, these upheavals are not indispensable or inevitable in the near future. ? ...
... by learned verbiage) that no trace is left of the connection between the counter-revolutionary sentiments in Russia and the position and interests ...
... grouped around Purishkevich and Markov the Second, and are impotently [!] spluttering the venom of despair. . . . The majority of our big landowners, ...
... state power, their social substance permeating, as it were, the entire Prussian monarchy, the entire Prussian bureaucracy! To this day, sixty-three years ...
... of his liberal complacency. Then he goes on to declare that a compromise among the various groups of the bourgeoisie is not difficult, and is likely. ...
... not such an assumption (the assumption of the second condition) mean accepting the liberals' wish as reality? ...
... no way be changed or this triumph will indirectly be the expression of a democratic revival which is bound to come into sharp conflict with the above-mentioned ...
... The possibility of storms and upheavals is, naturally, not out of the question, but they will not become something indispensable and inevitable, ...
... Duma and above it) is Purishkevichism, occasionally moderated by the grumbling of the Guchkovs and Milyukovs, the talk about the impending domination ...
... of an upheaval. ? ? A vulgar democrat may reduce the whole matter to the question whether there is an upheaval or not. The Marxist ? is primarily ...
... and rural petty bourgeoisie, was contented and reactionary. ? ? Perhaps R-kov fancied he saw a comparison between the role of the democratic ...
... which R-kov draws, with rare fearlessness and straightforwardness, it must be said in all fairness to him, are interesting primarily because ...
... such an organisation exists, says. R-kov, referring to an open and broad political organisation of the workers, the struggle is bound to assume an anarchistic ...
... utopian the suggested foundation of an open workers ? association at a time when absolutely peaceful, tame, non-political trade unions are being suppressed? ...
... that, since he now harbours no thoughts, the burden of the juridically flimsy- accusations will fall upon the Dumbadzes own heads! Yes, indeed, ...
... manifesto of liquidationism published by R-kov in Nasha Zarya, people, primarily out of fear of the em- ? barrassment involved, will begin to ...
... Movement at the Present Moment. Another article by Lenin, From the Camp of the Stolypin 'Labour' Party, is also a criticism of Rozhkov (see ...
... of the Question of the DictatorshipVladimir Ilyich Lenin : A Brief Outline of the Split in the RSDLPVladimir Ilyich Lenin : A Draft Programme of Our ...