Cover of A Chapter Of Adventures

A Chapter Of Adventures

Auhtor: G Henty

Language: english
Published: 1890

Genres:

young readers,  nautical,  adventure
Downloads: 265
eBook size: 191Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Chapter Of Adventures':

A Chapter Of Adventures Classic Reprint by G A Henty. BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE George Alfred Henty was born near Cambridge in 1832 and educated at Vestminster School and Gonville and Caius College Cambridge. He volunteered for service in the Crimean Var and after some varied experiences adopted a journalistic career. He served as war correspondent of the Standard during the Austro-Italian campaign of 1866 and was afterwards a correspondent in the Abyssinian Var the Franco-German Var the Ashanti Var c. His first book for boys was published in 1868 and was followed by a long and very successful series including The Young Franc-Tireurs 1872 In Times oj Peril 1881 Under Drake s Flag 1883 With Clive in India 1884 The Lion oj the North 1886 Orange and Greell 1888 TIle Lion of St. A ark 1889 By Pike and Dyke 1890 By Right oj Conquest 1891 rVith Afoore at Corunna 1898 lVt th Kitchener itt the Soudan 1903 and lVitlz tlte Allies to Pekin 1904 He died in 1902. Table of Contents CONTENTS CHAP 1 A FISHING VILLAGI o II CAUGHT BY THE TIDE III A RUN FROM HARWICH IV THE VRECK o V THE RESCUE VI ALTERED PROSPECTS VII ON BOARD THE VILD lVAVE VIII ALEXANDRrA o IX THE RIOT IN ALEXANDRIA X PRISONERS o XI THE BOMBARDMENT XII FREE o o o o o 0 o o o o o XIII AMONG FRIENDS XIV A SET OF RASCALS XV A TURi ATENING SKY XVI OLD JOE S YARN XVII IN DANG ROUS XVIII A CYCLONE XIX CAST ASHORE SEAS . . o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 IS 27 37 . 46 57 69 78 89 . 99 o 110 o o 120 131 . 143 153 163 . 180 . 191 o 201 Abo

Excerpts from the Book 'A Chapter Of Adventures':


... that the choice he had made was a wise one. Mrs. Godstone and her daughter had been down twice to call upon Mrs. Robson since her arrival at Dulwich, ...
... He had been actively preparing for a general rising against the Europeans by the propagation of stories hostile to the latter, and by ...
... You fellows' wounds are nothing to that. You will have to wear your hair long, Jim it won't be noticed much if you do. Don't tell ...
... to embark at once, and an ultimatum was despatched to the Egyptian ministry, saying that unless the works were stopped and a satisfactory answer to ...
... in many other parts separate conflagrations were raging. There was, however, no time to pause to examine the scene. The party hurried along ...
... battered the forts that still held out. The following day a strong force of marines came ashore and patrolled the streets. At the sight of the British ...
... of the 60th and a squadron of mounted infantry went out beyond Ramleh. The enemy's cavalry were driven off, and there was an exchange of artillery ...
... at it in a day or two. However, as I sent off a telegram this morning saying that we were empty, I suppose we shall get orders this afternoon or to-morrow ...
... we had got on fairly well. Now he told us that he thought the gale would soon blow itself out, and that as soon as it abated enough to set a rag ...
... I kept my spirits up. You see I was a young fellow, and young fellows take things cheerful and make light of what would break them down when they get ...
... was under water. Further and further she went, until the ends of the yards were under water, and the sea seemed to Jack, who was holding on by ...
... been more powerless. That is right, steward, get me my oil-skin and sou'-wester from the cabin. You had better get a kettle on over the spirit-stove, ...
... are few indeed who stop at Leigh, or who, once at Southend, take the trouble to walk three miles along the shore to the fishing village. It may be doubted, ...
... belonging to one of his uncles. The lad's own predilections were entirely for the sea his happiest times had been spent at Leigh, and his ...
... steamer has run on to the Middle Ground. The boys had just thrown down their spade and rake, and had agreed to knock off, and they now ran across ...
... at the edge of the sands, far down at the mouth of the river. Boats are out for many days together, frequently in terrible seas, when the boat is more ...
... because of me, not for anything in the world. Do try it, uncle. It would be awful to think of afterwards, when we hear of her being lost with all hands, ...
... in a boat, a stretcher being sent off for him to be laid on. A messenger had been already sent up to the doctor on the top of the hill to come down ...
... to do with it one way or the other. Except when you swam out for the line, Mrs. Godstone said smiling. I had one tied round me, ...
... experience in a fore-and-aft craft. Of course the work is very different here still it is a capital apprenticeship, and men who can manage a bawley ...