Cover of Early Britain

Early Britain

Auhtor: Grant Allen

Language: english
Published: 1881

Genres:

history
Downloads: 418
eBook size: 197Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, March 2007


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'Early Britain':

Early Britain Roman Britain by Edward Conybeare. Early Britain-Roman Britain is presented here in a high quality kindle edition. This popular classic work by Edward Conybeare is in the English language and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of Edward Conybeare then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.

Excerpts from the Book 'Early Britain':


... Europe while a fourth and final swarm was that of the Slavonic tribes, which still inhabit only the extreme eastern portion of the continent. With ...
... metal-work. A golden drinking-horn found in Sleswick, and engraved with the maker's name, referred to the middle of the fourth century, contains the ...
... the people of the northern marshlands, the white horse seems to have been held in especial honour, and to this day a white horse rampant forms the ...
... were united into a single kingdom. However, as Eadwine assumed some of the imperial Roman trappings, it seems not unlikely that a portion at ...
... probably on a mere plundering raid. But in 571 Cuthwulf, brother of Ceawlin, again marched northward, and fought against the Welsh at Bedford, and took ...
... among us and when they do occur, they occur side by side with relations of every other shade. As a rule, our people vary infinitely in complexion ...
... ENGLAND. We can now picture to ourselves the general aspect of the country after the English colonies had established themselves as far west ...
... the Apostle, which he himself had hastily built of wood, while he was being catechised and prepared for Baptism and in the same city he gave the ...
... regular codes. Before the conversion we have not a single written document upon which to base our history from the moment of Augustine's landing we ...
... that the monastic system did good to England. The monasteries owned large tracts of land which they could cultivate on a co-operative plan, as cultivation ...
... every shire and every kingdom fought for itself alone. If the Dorset men could only drive away the host from Charmouth and Portland, they cared little ...
... terms. Generalship and statesmanship, as we understand them, did not yet exist, and to speak of them in the ninth century in England is to be guilty ...
... foreign merchants at Canterbury, Dover, Arundel, and many other towns and London and Bristol certainly traded on their own account with the Continent. As ...
... By the date of the Conquest there were many, and their functions were such as befitted a more diversified national life. Communications had become far ...
... and for a time the town held out. So Swegen marched westward, and took Bath. There, the thegns of the Welsh-kin counties-Somerset, Dorset, Devon, ...
... Finns, on hunting on fiscathe be thre s. He | winter, and on summer on sde tht he t sumum cirre | fishing by the sea. He said wolde fandian hu longe ...
... mind than the Anglo-Saxon literature. A vast mass of manuscripts has been preserved for us, embracing works in prose and verse of the most varied ...
... But the Latin schools, set up by the Italian monks, introduced into England a totally new and highly-developed literature. The pagan Anglo-Saxons had ...
... and cloistered impurity. Little they trow of marriage vow, as ere this I said: little they reck the breach of oath or troth swearing and for-swearing, ...
... 165. Taylor, Rev. Isaac, on Hundreds, 68. Teutonic race, 4. Tha, 23. Theodore of Canterbury, 107. Thunor, 16 his worship, 77. Towns, ...