Cover of A Question of Principle

A Question of Principle

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1908

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 337
eBook size: 236Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, November 2009


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Question of Principle':

The perspective which Lenin arrived at in 1917 coincided with Trotskys theory of Permanent Revolution worked out following the experience of the 1905 revolution. This resolved the long debate within the Russian labor movement which revolved around three different conceptions of the coming revolution. All the Russian Marxists were agreed that the tasks of social transformation facing them were those of the bourgeois-democratic revolution. These were: the breaking up of the big estates and the distribution of the land to the peasants. The abolition of the Tsarist monarchy and the establishment of a democratic republic. The separation of the church and state. The introduction of social reforms urgently demanded by the workers and the peasants but also necessary to clear the way for the development of capitalism. Given this which political forces would provide the leadership? Would it be (a) the liberal capitalist representatives? If so would the workers parties including the Bolsheviks limit themselves to conditional support for the liberals accepting that the struggle for socialism would come later under more favorable conditions which would develop under a capitalist regime? Would it be (b) the working class in alliance with the representatives of the peasantry who would take the power - limiting themselves however at this stage to bourgeois-democratic tasks? Or would it be (c) the working class leading the exploited peasantry behind them who would take power carry through the bourgeois-democratic tasks - but at the same time implementing radical changes in their own interest which would begin the transition to socialism? Position (a) was adopted by the Mensheviks who formed the right wing of the Social-Democratic party. From Marx they drew highly schematic conclusions: that feudalism capitalism and socialism followed in succession and one historical stage had to be complete before another could commence. There was no question according to this view of the working class initiating a socialist revolution until the bourgeois revolution was complete.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Question of Principle':


... 7) 1917? Published June 10 (May 28), 1917 in Pravda No. 68 ?? Published according to the newspaper text ? Translated from the Russian Edited ...
... A QUESTION OF PRINCIPLE FORGOTTEN WORDS OF DEMOCRACY     The filthy torrent ...
... have spewed out against the Kronstadt comrades has revealed once more how dishonest these papers are. They have seized on a quite ordinary and unimportant ...
... with the Kronstadt people on the basis of a compromise resolution. Needless to say, we express our hope and confidence that this compromise resolution, ...
... a fact long ago observed by us and officially recognised in our Party's resolution (on the Soviets), namely, that in the local areas the revolution ...
... Mensheviks as well as the Cadets did not wish to or could not grasp the significance of this fact.     Secondly, the Kronstadt incident ...
...     The Mensheviks, to whose party Ministers Tsereteli and Skobelev belong, still claim to be Marxists. Tsereteli and Skobelev got a resolution ...
... the point. All we shall say is that Marxism always gives close attention to questions of democratism, and the name of democrats can hardly be denied ...
... elected by the Kronstadt population?     Obviously, they did not.     In support of this conclusion, we shall quote the ...
... (now known as the Erfurt Programme) Engels wrote in 1891 that the German proletariat was in need of a single and united republic.     ...
... after the American pattern. That is what we [the German Social-Democrats] should have too. How self-government can be organised and how a bureaucracy ...
... than, for instance, Swiss federalism, where each canton is really independent of the confederation [i.e., the central government] but at the same time ...
... and Prefects. This right of appointing local officers is entirely unknown in English-speaking countries, and in future we must politely abolish ...
... the following demand:     Complete self-government in the communes, districts, and regions through officers elected by universal suffrage ...
... words leave nothing to be desired in the way of clarity and definiteness.     Worthy citizens, Ministers Tsereteli and Skobelev! You are ...
... papers. The Kronstadt people have not broken the compromise agreement. Not a single fact remotely suggesting a breach of this agreement has been ...
... mere subterfuge, since you canj only break an agreement by deeds and not by newspaper articles. The fact then remains, that Ministers Tsereteli, Skobelev ...
... S. 12). ? ?[p. 538] Recommended ReadingLoved this book? Other books that may be interesting to you:Vladimir Ilyich Lenin : ...
... Paris in 1892, is a collection of poems by the Portuguese poet Ant'onio Nobre. It is the only work of his that appeared in his lifetime, and a classic ...
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