Cover of A Shropshire Lad

A Shropshire Lad

Auhtor: A Housman

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 150
eBook size: 368Kb

Review by Timothy B. Riley, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Shropshire Lad':

A Shropshire Lad is a cycle of sixty-three poems by the English poet Alfred Edward Housman. Some of the better-known poems in the book are To an Athlete Dying Young Loveliest of Trees the Cherry Now and When I Was One-and-Twenty. The collection was published in 1896. Housman originally titled the book The Poems of Terence Hearsay referring to a character in the volume but changed the title at the suggestion of his publisher.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Shropshire Lad':


... day, To-night she'll be alone. And here's a bloody hand to shake, And oh, man, here's good-bye We'll sweat no more on scythe and rake, ...
... whether the theme dealt with is ruin or defeat, or some great tragic crisis of spirit, or with moods and ardours of pure enjoyment and simplicities ...
... which Shropshire lads and landscapes are presented. It must be, however, in the miraculous fusing of the two. Whatever that secret is, the ...
... Round both the shires they ring them In steeples far and near, A happy noise to hear. Here of a Sunday morning My love and I would lie ...
... burns, The shires have seen it plain, From north and south the sign returns And beacons burn again. Look left, look right, the hills are bright, ...
... the Nile spills his overflow Beside the Severn's dead. We pledge in peace by farm and town The Queen they served in war, And fire the beacons ...
... The blood that warms an English yeoman, The thoughts that hurt him, they were there. There, like the wind through woods in riot, Through ...
... round, so travellers tell, And straight though reach the track, Trudge on, trudge on, 'twill all be well, The way will guide one back. But ...
... worse men than they And friends abroad must bear in mind Friends at home they leave behind. Oh, I shall be stiff and cold When I forget you, ...
... not in plight to bear, If they would, another's care. They have enough as 'tis: I see In many an eye that measures me The mortal sickness of ...
... wand. A Shropshire Lad XLIII. THE IMMORTAL PART When I meet the morning beam, Or lay me down at night to dream, I hear my bones ...
... you died as fits a man. Now to your grave shall friend and stranger With ruth and some with envy come: Undishonoured, clear of danger, Clean ...
... Your friends by field and town Oh, town and field will mind you Till Ludlow tower is down. A Shropshire Lad XLVIII Be still, my soul, ...
... met, I thought the look would say, We both were fashioned far away We neither knew, when we were young, These Londoners we live among. ...
... The wanderer, marvelling why, Halts on the bridge to hearken How soft the poplars sigh. He hears: long since forgotten In fields where I was ...
... away Lives to die another day, And cowards' funerals, when they come Are not wept so well at home. Therefore, though the best is bad, ...
... be lonely Asleep with these or those. A Shropshire Lad LXII Terence, this is stupid stuff: You eat your victuals fast enough ...
... get their fill before they think With poisoned meat and poisoned drink. He gathered all that springs to birth From the many-venomed earth First ...
... to-morrow, But never as good as new. -Suppose I wound my arm right round- 'Tis true, young man, 'tis true. Some lads there are, 'tis shame ...
... nicht verloren sein, or, Ambivalence / by Tony Kushner - Painting you / by William Finn - Waiting for Philip Glass / by Wendy Wasserstein - ...