Cover of A Man Woman

A Man Woman

Auhtor: Frank Norris

Language: english
Published: 1904

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 212
eBook size: 204Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Man Woman':

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects written by the eighteenth-century British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy. In it Wollstonecraft responds to those educational and political theorists of the eighteenth century who did not believe women should have an education. She argues that women ought to have an education commensurate with their position in society claiming that women are essential to the nation because they educate its children and because they could be companions to their husbands rather than mere wives. Instead of viewing women as ornaments to society or property to be traded in marriage Wollstonecraft maintains that they are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men. Wollstonecraft was prompted to write the Rights of Woman after reading Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigords 1791 report to the French National Assembly which stated that women should only receive a domestic education she used her commentary on this specific event to launch a broad attack against sexual double standards and to indict men for encouraging women to indulge in excessive emotion. Wollstonecraft wrote the Rights of Woman hurriedly in order to respond directly to ongoing events she intended to write a more thoughtful second volume but she died before completing it. While Wollstonecraft does call for equality between the sexes in particular areas of life such as morality she does not explicitly state that men and women are equal. Her ambiguous statements regarding the equality of the sexes have since made it difficult to classify Wollstonecraft as a modern feminist particularly since the word and the concept were unavailable to her. Although it is commonly assumed now that the Rights of Woman was unfavourably received this is a modern misconception based on the belief that Wollstonecraft was as reviled during her lifetime as she became after the publication of William Godwins Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798). The Rights of Woman was actually well-received when it was first published in 1792. One biographer has called it perhaps the most original book of Wollstonecrafts Wollstonecrafts century.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Man Woman':


... Bent. Once more the expedition returned to the morning's camping-place, and, harnessing itself to the third McClintock, struggled forward with ...
... me. We are bound to meet the relief ships or the steam whalers in that latitude. Oh, you can look at the address, added Bent as Ferriss, turning the ...
... prolonged sigh of infinite sadness, clamouring again upon the instant. Dick, said Bent, returning his journal to the box of records, it is the end ...
... the great granite-built agency on the opposite side of the square she was all but running, and as she put her key in the door the rain swept down ...
... looking out of the window. Very attentive, Lloyd merely nodded her head, murmuring:. I understand.. When Dr. Street had gone Lloyd immediately ...
... these despatches. Might it not be so. She caught her breath quickly. The terror, the fearful anxiety that had haunted and oppressed her for so long, ...
... and its opening covered with a screen of white feathers. The windows were flung wide, and a great flood of white sunlight came pouring into the room. ...
... named Miss Wakeley, has been on this case, she continued, but it seems she has allowed herself to contract the disease herself. She went to the hospital ...
... stood at the bed-head, and in that room the little things of life had no place. The king was holding court, and the swarm of small, everyday issues, ...
... beyond all retrieving. There in that commonplace little room, with its trivial accessories, its inadequate background, a battle royal swiftly prepared ...
... that you do not risk something that is more to us both than life itself, by keeping me from it. Do you think I could love you so deeply and so truly ...
... pretending an interest in the display. It seemed to her that by now everybody in the streets must have noted that there was something wrong with her. ...
... and overcoming. Where now was the exhilaration of battle with the Enemy, even supposing she yet had the strength to continue the fight. Who was ...
... the front room at the end of the hall, silent. Bent picked up his valise again and went upstairs to the rooms that had been set apart for him. He did ...
... putting his chin in the air as if to say that, after all, it was not his affair. Well, he said, it's queer to see how things will tangle themselves ...
... shall-you will compel me to use force. Don't let it come to that.. Calmly Lloyd took both his wrists in the strong, quiet clasp of one palm, and ...
... hair from one temple. H'm-no. He says-something. But never mind what he says. Ward, I must be going back to the City. You don't need a nurse any ...
... It can be done, and we-America-ought to do it.. Bent stared at her, startled by her outburst. This English expedition, Lloyd continued, ...
... temperatures now. Where were we. 'Eight hundred and seventy-four fathoms, minus forty-six hundredths degrees centigrade.'. On the afternoon ...
... words he felt must soon be spoken, willing to put off the inevitable a few seconds longer. I don't know, he muttered, looking from the flag to ...