Cover of The Workers Party and the Peasantry

The Workers Party and the Peasantry

Auhtor: Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Language: english
Published: 1901

Genres:

political,  revolutionary,  social history
Downloads: 282
eBook size: 304Kb

Review by Stephen M. Charme, April 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Workers Party and the Peasantry':

Every revolution begins at the top as the ruling class with no clear way forward split over what course of action to take. In January 1916 a strike wave developed against food shortages and speculators. Feeling the movement building up from below a section of the ruling class favored making limited concessions. During late 1916 the mystic monk Rasputin was murdered and plots were laid for a palace coup to remove the Tsar and the Tsarina. The signs of splits in the ruling class opened the floodgates of revolution. The tensions brought about by the war of five million dead or wounded of the armys bread ration being cut by a third between December 1916 and February 1917 of the shortages of food in the towns burst to the surface. The February Revolution began on the 23rd (dates are on the old Russian calendar add 13 days for the modern calendar) with a strike by women textile workers in Petrograd. On International Womens Day 90000 were on strike including many soldiers wives. They marched to the Duma (a truncated parliament) demanding bread which as Trotsky commented was like demanding milk from a he-goat. On the following day half of the industrial workers of Petrograd joined the strike. As the strikes grew the slogans rapidly changed to directly political challenges to the regime: Down with the aristocracy! Down with the war! Yet none of the workers organizations initially called for the strikes. Indeed the most brilliant Bolshevik organization the committee in the industrial Vyborg area feeling the tension but not believing the time was right for an insurrection which they saw could develop from the strikes initially opposed the call for strikes on February 23. Thus one of the most oppressed and least organized layers perhaps not as burdened by consideration of where their strike could lead but burning with desire to take action opened the floodgates of revolution. The police tried to break up the crowds aided by Cossacks (cavalry) some mounted police and occasionally by infantry. The crowds fought the police but tried to neutralize the Cossacks and win over the soldiers in action. On the 25th cadet officers fired on demonstrating workers killing 16. On the 27th there were further demonstrations and troops were called out to suppress them. After clashed with the workers the troops began to mutiny. In some places the workers had succeeded in uniting with the soldiers penetrating the barracks and receiving rifles.

Excerpts from the Book 'The Workers Party and the Peasantry':


... in February 1901 ? ? ? ?? Published in April 1901 ? ? ? ? in Iskra, No. 3 ? ? ? ? Published according to the Iskra text?? Translated ...
... of the land. Ten years after the emancipation of the peasantry the landlords themselves admitted to government officials investigating the state of ...
... themselves from below. But in embarking on emancipation, the government did everything possible and impossible to satisfy the greed of the injured ...
... Reform, to rent land, to buy the few miserable articles of factory-made goods which began to squeeze out the home manufactures of the peasant, to ...
... and enterprising muzhiks who laid hands upon the peasant farms and the peasants' lands, and who formed the kernel of the rising rural bourgeoisie. The ...
... which forbids the peasant to dispose of his land, such as collective liability, or the system of prohibiting the peasants from freely leaving the village ...
... would not be doing its duty if it did not render every assistance to this struggle. This assistance should take the form, briefly put, of ...
... they are still too heavily burdened with the misfortunes of the peasantry as a whole to enable the movement of the rural workers to assume national ...
... millions which the tsarist government has extorted from them in the course of the years to satisfy the greed of the slaveowners. There is talk of the ...
... the local, concrete, and most pressing needs of the peasantry yet it must not be confined to these needs, but must be steadily directed towards widening ...
... but every sensible peasant who thinks at all about the things he sees going on around him will understand what the workers are fighting for, ...
... the Reform of February 19, 1861, fell short bccause of its distortion by the landlords and the officials. Our Party must include such demands in its programme ...
... not in order to chain them to the village, but to guide the activities of those forces that cannot find an outlet anywhere except in the rural ...
... a small detachment of volunteers, when the reserves of Social-Democratic forces were limited to circles of young people who all went to the workers. ...
... and influence. This process will evolve much more widely and rapidly when we issue a slogan that will bring our influence to bear and when we unfurl ...
... of 1902 and adopted by the Second Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. ? ?[p.420] ? [153] A guarter or beggar's allotment - a quarter of ...
... Despite the squandering of the advantages of the planned economy by the monstrous one-party, totalitarian regime which subsequently arose, the Russian ...
... before establishing the world's first officially socialist state. As a theorist, his... >>read more<... of these parties' leaders that they do the job their supporters expected them to do. Their key demands were that the socialists break with ...
... address to the delegates, he advocated uncompromising opposition to the war and the Provisional Government and irreconcilable hostility toward all ...