Cover of A Lear Of The Steppes

A Lear Of The Steppes

Auhtor: Ivan Turgenev

Language: english
Published: 1870

Genres:

short story collection
Downloads: 93
eBook size: 444Kb

Review by Daniel G. Lebryk, October 2008


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Lear Of The Steppes':

Ivan Turgenev Born October 28 1818(1818-10-28)Oryol Russian Empire Died September 3 1883 (aged 64)Bougival Seine-et-Oise Occupation Novelist and Playwright Genres Realism Notable work(s) A Sportsmans Sketches ? Fathers and Sons ? A Month in the Country Influences Shakespeare Goethe Pushkin Belinsky Lermontov Byron Schiller Hegel Schlegel Schopenhauer Bakunin Influenced Theodor Storm Gustave Flaubert Herman Bang Henry James Joseph Conrad Anton Chekhov Irne Nmirovsky Ernest Hemingway Truman Capote Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (November 9 1818 - September 3 1883) was a Russian novelist short story writer and playwright. His first major publication a short story collection entitled A Sportsmans Sketches is a milestone of Russian Realism and his novel Fathers and Sons is regarded as one of the major works of 19th-century fiction.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Lear Of The Steppes':


... wherein he excels. He is rich in all the gifts, so he perates into everything but it is the perfect harmony existing between his gifts that ...
... both hands out in front of him. Luckily for Souvenir he managed to get away, his brother-in law's open hands came into collision with the edge of the ...
... already had time to get into his droshky and drive away. Next morning my mother, who was astonished and even alarmed, as much by Martin Petrovitch's ...
... Near them stood Zhitkov, in a new uniform, with the habitual expression of dull and greedy expectation in his eyes, and with a greater usion of ...
... so sympathetically after Martin Petrovitch, and so persistently muttered and chewed his lips, turning his eyes upwards, that I felt moved, as I looked ...
... that's been mislaid somewhere. And what use is reading at his age.. And who shaves him. I asked again. Sletkin gave an approving laugh, as though ...
... look upon the light of day. That was why I was unwilling to come and see you, ma'am, from this same feeling, from shame for my disgrace. I have tried ...
... no sheets on the bed. Souvenir, who met us in the passage, and popped into the green room with us, promptly proceeded to dance, grinning and chuckling, ...
... three carts-appeared at the gates. The tired horses panted, the men jumped out, one after another, into the mud. Aha. Harlov shouted at the ...
... was in those days I simply wanted to have a look at God's world. I was young, and in good health and spirits, and had plenty of money. Troubles had ...
... better cross the Rhine by moonlight.. We set off. Through the low gates of the town (it was enclosed on all sides by an ancient wall of cobble-stones, ...
... evening, when I reached the vineyard where the Gagins lived, I found the gate fastened. Without losing much time in deliberation, I made ...
... longer at school. I found myself in a rather serious difficulty. Suddenly a blessed idea came to me-to resign my commission and go abroad for a year ...
... but I thought a great deal about her, her fate absorbed me, I rejoiced at our unexpected intimacy. I felt that it was only yesterday I had got to know ...
... it were open, and the door too stood open some bits of paper were lying about in front of the doorway a maidservant appeared with a broom at the door. I ...
... of my past. long past, life. When we both left the university in 183- I was three-and-twenty. You went into the service I decided, as you know, ...
... the contrary, I rejoiced in it. More than that that day I declared my intentions only not to Vera Nikolaevna, as one would naturally suppose, but to ...
... kissed her hand. She turned a little away, bent her eyes upon me (I have never seen such a look, except in her there is dreaminess and intent attention ...
... I am sitting on your sofa, I shall have a great deal to tell you, but now I really don't want to what's the use. I shall only talk nonsense, I dare ...
... Youth may be excused for thinking so. But it is shameful to delude oneself when the stern face of truth has looked one in the eyes at last. Good-bye. ...