Cover of Cameos From English History From Rollo To Edward Ii

Cameos From English History From Rollo To Edward Ii

Auhtor: Charlotte Mary Yonge

Language: english

Genres:

classic
Downloads: 74
eBook size: 882Kb

Review by Michael Gallagher, August 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Excerpts from the Book 'Cameos From English History From Rollo To Edward Ii':

... the Saxon earl. Another fugitive in Hereward's camp was the high-spirited Abbot Frithric, whose steady opposition to the illegal encroachments ...
... and the workmen began to pull down the old one, which had been built by St. Oswald, he stood watching them in silence, till at last he shed tears. ...
... limits will only allow us to dwell on those through whom the Crusade is connected with English history. The Anglo-Normans had not been so forward ...
... that an unlettered King is no better than a donkey with a crown on. In spite of his devotion, to St. Martin, Foulques sacrilegiously ...
... when we left our rightful lady for a stranger. We have held with you against our lady the Empress, and we repent, for we have sinned against God ...
... him himself, but gave him letters to the Archbishops of Rouen and Nevers, and they granted him absolution on which he returned triumphant to England, ...
... Wexford, and took it then attacked the Prince of Ossory, and gained a great victory after which they had full opportunity of seeing of what a savage ...
... that 3,000 Saracens had entered Joppa! He summoned a few knights, and, without a word to the rest, galloped back into the city. The panic inspired ...
... his own fiefs, which he put in a state of defence. A few days after, John and his wicked squire, Pierre de Maulac, left the court, giving notice that ...
... a recreant who had become a pirate, and was reckoned the best mariner of his time. John fled from Dover, leaving it to the trusty and loyal Hubert ...
... now and then launching volleys of Greek fire. The King, on seeing these coming, would kneel down, and cry, Lord, spare my people! But worse enemies ...
... Eleanor of Castile, insisted on accompanying him and when the perils of the expedition were represented to her, she replied, Nothing ought to ...
... observing Easter was, with them, derived from the East, and differed by some weeks from that ordained by the Roman Church. An old hermit advised ...
... old Count of Flanders and his Countess were invited to Paris by Philippe, who insisted that they should bring his godchild and namesake, the betrothed ...
... contrary extreme, or from becoming wayward, indifferent, and dissipated. This has been the history of many an heir-apparent, and of none more ...
... and another party were concealed close without the walls. The drawbridge was lowered, and the portcullis raised to admit the forage, when, at ...
... him, and reproached his nobles for not having interceded for him. Fourteen bannerets and fourteen other knights were executed, being all who were ...
... son of Edmund Ironside his marriage owned as Etheling. Edwin, grandson of Earl Leofric enemy of Harold submits to the conqueror ...
... assumes the title of Governor defeated at the battle of Falkirk his betrayal and execution. Wallingford Castle, Maude escapes to. Walsingham, ...
... him in his studies, and end by causing her maiden to count out three or four coins into his hand, and sending him to the royal larder for refreshment. ...