Cover of A History Of Lumsden Battery C S A

A History Of Lumsden Battery C S A

Auhtor: George Little

Language: english
Published: 1905

Genres:

history
Downloads: 21
eBook size: 327Kb

Review by Daniel G. Lebryk, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A History Of Lumsden Battery C S A':

Alexander George (Alec) Craig (1897?1973) was an author and poet who wrote extensively about banned books. Craig was interested more generally in sexual behaviour and reform and was also engaged with the socialist movement. He was involved with the Progressive League reviewing books for their journal. His papers are in the archives of Senate House Library.

Excerpts from the Book 'A History Of Lumsden Battery C S A':


... George Little James Robert Maxwell. Release Date: August 28, 2008 [EBook #26455]. [Illustration: From left to right, back row-Private ...
... R. So that from May to August, the poor things could enjoy life without the fear of man. Ice was not then available to preserve them during the summer ...
... was down with camp fever for some weeks and reached the battery again near Cumberland Gap, after the retreat from Kentucky. On Friday, Aug. 8th, the ...
... started for Richmond, Va., sick, taking Corporal Sheperd with him. Lt. Cribbs was left in charge of the reserve artillery, and Lt. Ed Tarrant in command ...
... at this place. Prior to this date these reminiscences have been written up from a diary kept by Sergeant Major James T. Searcy, up to July 24, 1863, ...
... wash pot. Mr. Menander Rosser reminds me that Dr. James T. Searcy, (now Superintendent of the Alabama Bryce Hospital for the Insane) was boss of that ...
... point where he had previously been in daylight, from which he knew he could get the first glimpse of the Yankee camp opposite, when it should be light ...
... the road being blocked with wagons and artillery and in terrible condition with mud and ruts. A mile or two per hour being the best we could do. ...
... by him, that the culprit would rather die than submit to something degrading. We had some object lessons. The Major's hostler came to camp one night drunk. ...
... the guard house fire of a night, until the stump got out of the ground. Then he was sent for to Battalion Headquarters and our Major gave him quite ...
... church where Gen. Stewart was sitting on the steps and asked him where Lumsden's battery was. He said they are just over there about 100 yards, but ...
... from the wound. We more than evened up on the Yanks, a few days after, on June 27th, when Thomas's and McPherson's corps swarmed over their works ...
... The right of this fleeing corps came into our range making for the protection of their works at this angle and Lumsden's guns shelled them just in front ...
... and went into small fragments in every direction. The third struck the edge of the muzzle, and crushed it so that we could get no more shells into ...
... ears sticking out. When the mud dried, it flaked off and I was not much worse off temporarily than the balance of the crowd and they were welcome to ...
... struck at Yank's horse which about that time got a bullet from our infantry line and ran away from Hargrove, so that he made it to our new line. That ...
... extra duties for violation of military rules, but always the individual punished as well as all his comrades were perfectly conscious that the punishment ...
... his face, with a tuft of hair sticking out at the crown. The officers, in many cases, did not show up much better. In either case, the man, who ...
... of either Yank or Confederate, would draw several bullets, men standing with rifles at shoulder beneath the head logs and finger on trigger, ready to ...
... headquarters, they were handed to him, and he was ordered to start at once to get the boat that would leave that night. This ended the writer's personal ...