Cover of The Acharnians

The Acharnians

Auhtor: Aristophanes

Language: english
Published: 425

Genres:

drama,  classic
Downloads: 258
eBook size: 74Kb

Review by Joanna Daneman, January 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'The Acharnians':

Aristophanes (??????????? ca. 446 ? ca. 386 BC) son of Philippus of the deme Cydathenaus was a prolific and much acclaimed comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his forty plays survive virtually complete. These together with fragments of some of his other plays provide the only real examples of a genre of comic drama known as Old Comedy and they are in fact used to define the genre. Also known as the Father of Comedy and the Prince of Ancient Comedy Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author. His powers of ridicule were feared and acknowledged by influential contemporaries - Plato singled out Aristophanes play The Clouds as slander contributing to the trial and execution of Socrates although other satirical playwrights had caricatured the philosopher. His second play The Babylonians (now lost) was denounced by the demagogue Cleon as a slander against the Athenian polis. It is possible that the case was argued in court but details of the trial are not recorded and Aristophanes caricatured Cleon mercilessly in his subsequent plays especially The Knights. In my opinion he says through the Chorus in that play the author-director of comedies has the hardest job of all. (????????????????? ????? ??????????? ????? ???????)

Excerpts from the Book 'The Acharnians':


... in: Texas, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Iowa, Indiana, and Vermont. Oxford, MS 38655. Title: The Acharnians. Author: ...
... him to return the money. f[3] A hemistich borrowed from Euripides' 'Telephus.' f[4] The tragedies of Aeschylus continued to be played even after the ...
... Lucian, in his 'Hermotimus,' speaks of these golden mountains as an apocryphal land of wonders and prodigies. DICAEOPOLIS And how ...
... (November). The Greek word contains the suggestion of fraud. DICAEOPOLIS May I die if I believe a word of what you tell us. Excepting the ...
... the soldiers were usually ordered to assemble at some particular spot with provisions for three days. f[2] These feasts were also called the Anthesteria ...
... I return to my farmstead, thanks to the truce I have concluded, freed from cares, from fighting and from Lamachuses.[4] How much sweeter, oh Phales, ...
... them. f[1] That is, the baskets of charcoal. CHORUS Acharnians, what means this threat. Has he got one of our children in his house. What gives him ...
... knock at the door. Euripides, my little Euripides, my darling Euripides, listen never had man greater right to your pity. It is Dicaeopolis of the ...
... these petty details of stage property. DICAEOPOLIS I am going, but, great gods. I need one thing more unless I have it, I am a dead man. Hearken, ...
... the Pallas figure-heads are being regilded, crowds are surging under the market porticos, encumbered with wheat that is being measured, wine-skins, ...
... cuckoos did.[1] If I have concluded peace, 'twas disgust that drove me for I see men with hoary heads in the ranks and young fellows of your age shirking ...
... strains. We others, now old men and heavy with years, we reproach the city so many are the victories we have gained for the Athenian fleets ...
... us die in the quickest manner. DICAEOPOLIS That is the best way to get you out of all your troubles. MEGARIAN True. DICAEOPOLIS What other news ...
... it is. MEGARIAN This is too much. what an incredulous man. He says 'tis not a sow but we will stake, an you will, a measure of salt ground up with ...
... get you gone. Rascally hors, away with you. Whence has sprung this accursed swarm of Charis[1] fellows which comes assailing my door. f[1] A flute-player, ...
... more for a Copaic eel. f[1] The second day of the Dionysia or feasts of Bacchus, kept in the month Anthesterion (February), and called the Anthesteria. ...
... the fire to dry. CHORUS What lofty tones he uses. Did you hear him. DICAEOPOLIS Get the eels on the gridiron. CHORUS You are killing me with ...
... taking advantage of the Feast of Cups to invade our country. LAMACHUS Ah. the Generals. they are numerous, but not good for much. It's cruel, not ...
... of facing the winter. DICAEOPOLIS Take up the basket, 'tis a question of getting to the feast. CHORUS We wish you both joy on your journeys, ...
... surgeon Pittalus. DICAEOPOLIS Take me to the judges. Where is the king of the feast. The wine-skin is mine. LAMACHUS That spear has pierced my bones ...