Cover of A New Hochelagan Burying Ground Discovered At Westmount On

A New Hochelagan Burying Ground Discovered At Westmount On

Auhtor: William Douw Lighthall

Language: english
Published: 1898

Genres:

science
Downloads: 97
eBook size: 275Kb

Review by C. F. Hill, June 2010


Rating: (*****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A New Hochelagan Burying Ground Discovered At Westmount On':

William Douw Lighthall (December 27 1857 - August 3 1954) was a Canadian lawyer politician and poet. Born in Hamilton Canada West the son William Francis Schuyler Lighthall and Margaret Wright Lighthall attended McGill University where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1879 a Bachelor of Civil Law degree in 1881 and a Master of Arts degree in 1885. He practiced law with the firm of Cahan Lighthall Lighthall and Henry and his own firm of Lighthall Harwood. A member of the city council of Westmount Quebec he was mayor from 1900 to 1903. He helped found the Union of Canadian Municipalities in 1901. A poet his works Old Measures: Collected Verse were published in 1922. He also wrote novels The Young Seigneur or Nation-Making. A Romance in 1888 (written as Wilfrid Chteauclair) The False Chevalier or The Lifeguard of Marie Antoinette in 1898 Hiawatha the Hochelagan in 1906 and The Master of Life. A Romance of the Five Nations and of Prehistoric Montreal in 1908. In 1905 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and was its president from 1917 to 1918. Lighthall was among a number of the post-Darwinian thinkers of the nineteenth century who struggled with the concept of a Supreme Cause. Some of them not only struggled to redefine ?God? they also struggled to rename this entity. For his part Lighthall defined the cause as a ?force of will? and called that force ?The Outer Consciousness? ?The Outer Knowledge? ?The Directive Power? and ?The Person of Evolution?. However unlike the philosopher Schopenhauer or the novelist Hardy Lighthall who considered himself to be both a philosopher and a novelist was optimistic in his view of the nature of ?the will?. That optimism was based on Lighthalls unbending faith in the positive nature of evolutionary progress. His views are present in his Novels particularly in The Master of Life as well as in his hope for Canada as a nation. A reader of Lighthalls philosophical works may encounter some difficulty with the style. The main problem lies in the fact that Lighthall seldom completely reworked the lecture notes pamphlets and texts that he used to create the works as he published them. Furthermore he preferred to number his paragraphs as he considered these paragraphs to be ?capsular? ideas. Perhaps due to his training in law he preferred to protect the integrity of these modules rather than sacrifice any of their meaning for the integrated flow of ideas in a particular chapter as a whole. Because of this practice the author?s style appears jarringly disjointed at times. Ironically the logical progression of deductive reasoning so important to Lighthalls system is often under stress because of this style. The Lighthall system was an attempt to remarry science and religion in a single philosophical understanding of reality. Within the structure of that system Lighthall claimed to have avoided what he called the ?metaphysical? problem. He insisted that all that was proposed in the hypothesis was derived from his observation of scientific fact. To be precise Lighthall considered the principles of his theory to be ?proven? scientific facts and the proof to be founded upon deductive reasoning. The system equated Instinct with Will. Further it viewed Will as the manifest cause of both the conscious and unconscious act. Lighthall stated: All living action is willing and all is by nature purposive. ? Lighthall informed his readers that it was the phenomenon of the altruistic act that had been the initial ?middle? ground that had led him to the formulation of the theory: ?The utilitarian school with its intellectual solutions on the basis of joy and pains reflected by sympathy appeared to me to give a reasonable account of most other moral acts-but that an individual could deliberately annihilate himself for another evidently imported some element extraneous to the individuals own ordinary machinery of willing. Determined to accept no superficial explanation of the problem such as glib use of words like volition and conation I reduced acts of will to their simplest forms noting their gradual shadings into and intimate connections with habits instincts functions reflexes etc. and observing that these led to a world outside the consciousness of the individual. Thence I was brought to conclude like Schopenhauer that there is a unitary directive cause behind all these processes and I included Evolution itself regarded as one long act of willing. The characteristics that struck me most forcibly were the independence of this outer will and its apparently highly conscious nature.

Excerpts from the Book 'A New Hochelagan Burying Ground Discovered At Westmount On':


... New Hochelagan Burying-ground Discovered at Westmount on the Western Spur of Mount Royal, Montreal, July-September, 1898. Author: W. D. Lighthall. E-text ...
... have had a close and not yet fully ascertained race relationship, will be pleased to learn of the discovery of a prehistoric burying-ground which is probably ...
... which had been used as a football by boys, some of the teeth, which had originally been complete in number, being thus lost. This head is identical ...
... excavating in the St. George's Club-house grounds found three skeletons interred at a depth of from two to two and a half feet and with knees drawn ...
... and any objects found, and to enquire concerning previous excavations in the neighborhood and save the remains for scientific purposes. (They had been ...
... particularly as the soil of the locality is full of pieces of limestone and small boulders, closely resembling arrow heads, hammers and celts. ...
... doubtless be regarded with interest by scholars. The skulls have been fully identified as of the Indian type, and found to be those of two powerful ...
... interesting character may be looked for in the undisturbed neighborhood just referred to, the Raynes and Murray farms, and those on, the southern slope ...
... Towers of the Fort des Messieurs, some quarter of a mile eastward of the plateau referred to. In tracing back the history of the land in which these ...
... the interments were made subsequently to the founding of Montreal, is therefore eliminated. The authorities of the Seminary, who conceded the land, state ...
... had originally been assembled around Ville Marie but were removed to the Fort des Messieurs where Montreal College stands in 1662, and thence, towards ...
... grinder which had been lost years before. One armbone showed that it had once been broken and healed again. No objects were found, though the search ...
... Above her were found several flat stones which may have been used as scoops for the excavation. Under her neck was discovered the first manufactured ...
... prominent, the official measurement being 119 m.m. The gnathic index is 93, or orthognathous. The teeth are well preserved and not much worn, the ...
... feature of this skull is the well marked central vertical frontal ridge and some tendency to angularity of the vertex. In the whole this skull is ...
... are two animal bones. White and very dense in structure. They are both femura, one probably that of an ungulate the other of a carnivore. No. II.-A ...
... is masculine. The bones are long, large and heavy with marked impressions and processes. The femur measures 17-7/8 inches so that this man must ...
... of the three skulls, it would appear that No. I, was that of the most intelligent person of the three and No. III of the least No. II being ...
... was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman and noted Renaissance humanist. He was an important counsellor to Henry VIII of England ...
... JONSTON GOEDART REDI AND SWAMMERDAM. RAY. REAUMUR.... >>read more<