Cover of A Sentimental Journey

A Sentimental Journey

Auhtor: Laurence Sterne

Language: english
Published: 1768

Genres:

fiction
Downloads: 333
eBook size: 203Kb

Review by Bob Tobias, July 2005


Rating: (***)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Sentimental Journey':

A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy is a novel by the Irish-born English author Laurence Sterne written and first published in 1768 as Sterne was facing death. In 1765 Laurence Sterne travelled through France and Italy as far south as Naples and after returning determined to describe his travels from a sentimental point of view. The novel can be seen as an epilogue to the possibly unfinished work The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy Gentleman and also as an answer to Tobias Smolletts decidedly unsentimental Travels through France and Italy. (Sterne met Smollett during his travels in Europe and strongly objected to his spleen acerbity and quarrelsomeness. He modeled the character of Smelfungus on him.)The novel was extremely popular and influential and helped establish travel writing as the dominant genre of the second half of the 18th century. Unlike prior travel accounts which stressed classical learning and objective non-personal points of view A Sentimental Journey emphasized the subjective discussions of personal taste and sentiments of manners and morals over classical learning. Throughout the 1770s women travel writers began publishing significant numbers of sentimental travel accounts. Sentiment also became a favorite style among those expressing non-mainstream views including political radicalism.The narrator is the Reverend Mr. Yorick who is slyly represented to guileless readers as Sternes barely disguised alter ego. The book recounts his various adventures usually of the amorous type in a series of self-contained episodes. The book is less eccentric and more elegant in style than Tristram Shandy and was better received by contemporary critics. It was published on February 27 and on March 18 Sterne died.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Sentimental Journey':


... it now stands presented to my imagination, it gained more than it lost by it. When he had entered the room three paces, he stood still and laying his ...
... said I, which men of a certain turn of mind take, Mons. Dessein, in their own sensations,-I'm persuaded, to a man who feels for others as well as ...
... what we would wish, nothing is so ill-timed as to hint at the circumstances which make it so: you thank Fortune, continued she-you had reason-the heart ...
... it is to be found but heaven itself, were it possible to get there with such tempers, would want objects to give it every gentle spirit would come ...
... which Satan now and then puts it into my head I am,-it always mortifies the pride of the conceit, by reflecting how much I owe to the complexional ...
... to have forced them upon the use of it. - Grant me, O ye powers which touch the tongue with eloquence in distress!-what ever is my CAST, grant me ...
... up to the table, and making a thousand apologies for the liberty he was going to take, told me he had a letter in his pocket wrote by a drummer in ...
... ye small sweet courtesies of life, for smooth do ye make the road of it! like grace and beauty, which beget inclinations to love at first sight: 'tis ...
... Italy. A Sentimental Journey THE DWARF. PARIS. I had never heard the remark made by any one in my life, except by one and who that ...
... tone of it.-If Monsieur, said he, has not a passport (apparemment) in all likelihood he has friends in Paris who can procure him one.- Not that I know ...
... lad who was his groom who, not caring to destroy it, had taken it in his breast into the packet-and, by course of feeding it, and taking it once ...
... if he had something to sell, I bid La Fleur go up to him, and enquire for the Count's hotel. La Fleur returned a little pale and told me it was a Chevalier de ...
... of the scabbard: -'twas the shining face of a friend he had once given up-he look'd attentively along it, beginning at the hilt, as if to see whether ...
... sent impetuous from the heart, and virtue flies after it,-not to call it back, but to make the sensation of it more delicious to the nerves: -'tis ...
... serious, adust look, which passed and repass'd sedately along the street, making a turn of about sixty paces on each side of the gate of the ...
... happening to be blown out, she had borrow'd the sentry's match to light it: -it gave a moment's time for the Gascon's blood to run cool, and turn the ...
... she open'd her mouth.-She had lost her husband he had died, she said, of anguish, for the loss of Maria's senses, about a month before.-She had ...
... travell'd over all Lombardy, without money,-and through the flinty roads of Savoy without shoes: -how she had borne it, and how she had got supported, ...
... provided Monsieur's saying his prayers might not be deemed an infraction of the treaty. There was but one point forgot in this treaty, and that was ...
... the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the ...