Cover of A Jolly Fellowship

A Jolly Fellowship

Auhtor: Frank Stockton

Language: english
Published: 1880

Genres:

fiction and literature
Downloads: 456
eBook size: 202Kb

Review by M. Erb, February 2006


Rating: (****)
Copyright: Public Domain in the U.S.
Please check the copyright status in your country.

Summary of the Book 'A Jolly Fellowship':

Frank Richard Stockton (April 5 1834 ? April 20 1902) was an American writer and humorist best known today for a series of innovative childrens fairy tales that were widely popular during the last decades of the 19th century. Stockton avoided the didactic moralizing common to childrens stories of the time instead using clever humor to poke at greed violence abuse of power and other human foibles describing his fantastic characters adventures in a charming matter-of-fact way in stories like The Griffin and the Minor Canon (1885) and The Bee-Man of Orn (1887) which was published in 1964 in an edition illustrated by Maurice Sendak. His most famous fable is The Lady or the Tiger? (1882) about a man sentenced to an unusual punishment for having a romance with a kings beloved daughter. Taken to the public arena he is faced with two doors behind one of which is a hungry tiger that will devour him. Behind the other is a beautiful lady-in-waiting whom he will have to marry if he finds her. While the crowd waits anxiously for his decision he sees the princess among the spectators who points him to the door on the right. The lover starts to open the door and... the story ends abruptly there. Did the princess save her love by pointing to the door leading to the lady-in-waiting or did she prefer to see her lover die rather than see him marry someone else? That discussion hook has made the story a staple in English classes in American schools especially since Stockton was careful never to hint at what he thought the ending would be (according to Hiram Collins Haydn in The Thesaurus of Book Digests ISBN 0-517-00122-5). He also wrote a sequel to the story The Discourager of Hesitancy.

Excerpts from the Book 'A Jolly Fellowship':


... of one thing. I would be drowned in less than a minute. Scott would be head of the class. My mother, and little Helen-but I can't tell what my thoughts ...
... heard it. Are you all deaf.. This was a good deal to answer at once, so I just said that I didn't remember hearing any gong. Tom Myers and his brother ...
... with the tallow in his hand. [Illustration: 'HOLD YOUR TONGUE.' ROARED MR. RANDALL.]. Look here. said Rectus, holding on to the railing. ...
... to the ramparts, and looking over the low wall, evidently watching the sentry. I'll tell you what let's do, said Rectus. Let's make a rush for ...
... shook my head vigorously, and saying, No more. no more. threw myself over the wall, and seized the rope, Rectus holding the grapnel in its ...
... get to the town, she can run up to our hotel by herself. She knows the way.. Of course we had no objection to this, and the girl was helped aboard. ...
... do. I'm almost sure I saw that bird wink. It wouldn't surprise me if the fellows that own the rifles are in conspiracy with these birds. They let out ...
... out in him in the cemetery at Savannah. He seemed to be all right with Corny now, and we had a good time together. I was going to say to him, once, that ...
... Great Bahama early in the afternoon. I'm glad of that, said Corny but I suppose we sha'n't go near enough for us to see its calcareous formation.. Its ...
... sat and made themselves comfortable after meals. The dealers were negroes of every age,-men, women, boys, and girls, and they brought everything they ...
... these islands. The governor himself was a tall, handsome gentleman, not old a bit, as Corny put it afterward, and dressed all in white linen, which gave ...
... yard when we reached the house, and before long a good many more people came to see what was going on. They were all negroes but I don't believe ...
... wither a bit. She was a poor hand at withering. Please buy 'em, missy. I kep' 'em fur you. I been a-keepin' 'em all de mornin'.. I don't see ...
... was of no use they all came. We hurried on after the man with the light, and passed straight ahead through the narrow passage to the very end of it. There ...
... this room, about three feet wide, which led, our negro guide said, to a great cave, which ran along about a mile, until it reached the sea. There was ...
... and he told us to come with him. He looked tired and wet, and he told us that the storm had grown so bad that he didn't think it would be right ...
... to us, this man shouted something which I did not hear, and threw the life-preserver. It fell close to the raft. I thought, indeed, it was coming right ...
... the ocean side. And besides, we could get along a great deal better inside. He seemed to think more of that than anything else. We had a pretty dull ...
... injustice-as he considered it-was still going on, was too much for him. Do you sit there and tell me that, sir. he exclaimed, jumping up and ...
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